Document Type

Working Paper

Publication Date

2009

Abstract

Nearly two centuries later, borders between the U.S. and its neighbors to the north and south continue to be a source of consternation for indigenous people, although today, they offer fewer compensatory benefits. Instead, for the more than 40 tribes that live along or near the northern and southern borders of the U.S., as well as a comparable number of Canadian First Nations, tightened security around borders has meant increased difficulty in pursuing intertribal trade and exchange, greater obstacles to delivery of social and health services to tribal members who live across national borders and the attenuation of social and kinship networks.

Volume

4

Issue

January

Language

English

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