Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2004

Abstract

In this paper the authors describe efforts to help students take a stand for social justice in the College of Education at one predominantly White institution in the western Rocky Mountain region. The authors outline the theoretical frameworks that inform this work and the context of our work. The focus is on specific pedagogical strategies used with teacher education students who primarily were from monocultural (Euro-American) communities in their preparation for diversity and equity in multicultural America. The authors describe these strategies and themes that emerged from student responses. These themes included the value of seeing things from different perspectives, recognition of White privilege, and the role of power in schooling. The paper is concluded with broad questions and implications for research and teaching for social justice.

Publication Title

Scholar-Practitioner Quarterly

Volume

2

Issue

2

First Page

89

Last Page

106

Required Publisher's Statement

Scholar-Practitioner Quarterly Vol. 2, No. 2, Taking Stands for Social Justice (2004), pp. 89-106

Published by: Caddo Gap Press

Comments

Permission to post this article was given by Caddo Gap Press. While the article may be read by visitors to Western CEDAR, it may not be copied, reproduced, distributed, or sold by anyone without specific permission from Caddo Gap Press.

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