Document Type

Article

Publication Date

5-1-2001

Abstract

Landslides produced at the site where lava flows into the ocean at Kilauea volcano have been detected hydroacoustically. Up to 10 landslides per day were detected by a hydrophone on the Hawaii Undersea Geo-Observatory (HUGO), located 50 km south of the entry site. The largest of these landslides, partly subaerial events known as bench collapses, were detected by a network of hydrophones in the eastern Pacific, 5000–7000 km away from the source. The landslides display a characteristic spectral signature easily recognizable among other signals such as earthquake T-phases and anthropogenic noises. The fact that signals are detected at great distances suggests that hydroacoustic detection of landslides could be a powerful tool in tsunami monitoring and modeling efforts.

Publication Title

Geophysical Research Letters

Volume

28

Issue

9

First Page

1811

Last Page

1813

Required Publisher's Statement

© 2001 American Geophysical Union

DOI: 10.1029/2000GL012545

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2000GL012545/abstract

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