Document Type

Article

Publication Date

6-2016

Abstract

Perhaps no one put it better than Ellwood Cubberley who, during the first half of the twentieth century, was America’s best-known education historian. Cubberley had attended common schools in Indiana, taught school, and served as superintendent in San Diego, before becoming an education professor at Stanford in 1898 and receiving his doctorate from Teachers College. In his 1919 Public Education in the United States, written for normal-school students, Cubberley laid down a moral tale. He was on the side of the school reformers. His story told of the heroic efforts of Horace Mann and others to overcome ignorance and resistance to achieve something great: public school systems.

Publication Title

Reviews in American History

Volume

44

Issue

2

First Page

342

Last Page

355

Required Publisher's Statement

Published by Johns Hopkins University Press

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/rah.2016.0045

https://muse.jhu.edu/article/621512

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