Event Title

Relating to Race: The College of Ethnic Studies at Western Washington State College

Streaming Media

Description

In this presentation Michael Vendiola examines the case of the College of Ethnic Studies at Western Washington State College (CES-WWSC) through primary and secondary sources. In the mid-1960s American institutions of higher education witnessed the emergence of Black Studies and Ethnic Studies. Factors such as the rise of the Civil Rights Movement, the Black Power Movement and people of color movements, federal policy changes, philanthropic influences, and a general social change action set the stage for Black and Ethnic Studies to develop.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

13-1-2015 4:00 PM

End Date

13-1-2015 5:30 PM

Location

Washington State Archives. Goltz-Murray Archives Building. Bellingham (Wash.)

Resource Type

Moving Image

Duration

00:58:14

Title of Series

Heritage Resources Distinguished Speakers

Contributing Repository

Digital object made available by Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Program

University Archives

Identifier

HRSS_20150113_Vendiola

Subjects – Topical (LCSH)

Western Washington University--History; Education, Higher--Washington (State)--Bellingham--History; Minority college students--United States; Minority college students -- Washington (State); Minority college teachers -- United States; Minority college teachers -- Washington (State); Minority college students -- Washington (State) -- Bellingham; Minority college teachers -- Washington (State) -- Bellingham; Western Washington State College. College of Ethnic Studies

Subjects – Names (LCNAF)

Flora, Charles J. (Charles Jerry); Deloria, Vine

Geographic Coverage

Bellingham (Wash.)

Comments

Michael M. Vendiola is from the Swinomish, Lummi and Visayan (Filipino) nations. He is the current Program Manager of the Office of Native Education in the Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. He recently completed three years as the Swinomish Communications director and editor of qyuuqs News for the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community. Prior to Swinomish he served 13 years as the coordinator for the Ethnic Student Center at Western Washington University. He has worked at different levels of higher education for over 17 years for Whatcom Community College, Skagit Valley College, Northwest Indian College and Western Washington University. Michael holds a Bachelor’s degree in American Cultural Studies with a Native American Studies emphasis and a Master’s degree in Adult Education with an Instructional Technology emphasis. He is a doctoral student at the University of Washington in the College of Education’s Educational Leadership and Policy Studies program. Michael frequently serves as an emcee at pow wows, community events, & conferences, performs at public poetry readings & comedy venues, presents keynotes and workshops at various conferences & events, and is a professional working DJ. He likes to talk about wellness, community activism, education as empowerment, leadership, intergenerational partnerships, and community building.

2015-01-13_Vendiola_WWU.pptx (5403 kB)
Presentation slideshow

MV_poster.jpg (659 kB)
Event poster

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

video/mp4

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Jan 13th, 4:00 PM Jan 13th, 5:30 PM

Relating to Race: The College of Ethnic Studies at Western Washington State College

Washington State Archives. Goltz-Murray Archives Building. Bellingham (Wash.)

In this presentation Michael Vendiola examines the case of the College of Ethnic Studies at Western Washington State College (CES-WWSC) through primary and secondary sources. In the mid-1960s American institutions of higher education witnessed the emergence of Black Studies and Ethnic Studies. Factors such as the rise of the Civil Rights Movement, the Black Power Movement and people of color movements, federal policy changes, philanthropic influences, and a general social change action set the stage for Black and Ethnic Studies to develop.