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The Planet, Spring 2003, Too Much

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Publication Date

Spring 2003

Creator

Western Washington University. Associated Students; Huxley College of the Environment; Huxley College of Environmental Studies

Editor in Chief

Kate Koch

Photography Editor

Katie Kulla

Advisor

Scott Brennan

Publisher

Western Washington University

Associate Editors, Production Assistants, and Writers

Managing Editor: Sarah Loehndorf; Associate Editor: Matt Bucher; Copy Editor: Jessi Loerch; Assistant Editors: Torhil Dunham, Colin McDonald; Science Editor: Karl Kruger; Designers: Josh Barrett, Joe Kohlhas, Dan Petrzelka; Staff Photographers: Jamie Clark, Brandon Sawaya, Anya Traisman; Reporters: Andy Aley, Alison Bickerstaff, Andrea Boyle, Ethan Brown, Alex Brun, Jamie Carpenter, Wolfgang Deerkop, Laurel Eddy, Helen Hollister, Jonah Keith, Matt McDonald, Brendan McLaughlin, Carrie Meredith, Katie Scaief, Shara B. Smith, Jessica Stahl, David Stone, Taylor Zajonc; Planet Radio Producer: Aaron Managhan; Planet Radio Reporter: Sam Babani; Online Editor: Kate Granat

Table of Contents

NINE TO FIVE by David Stone

The majority of Americans feel their job limits their ability to recreate. While many think they will have time for recreation when they retire, this isn’t necessarily true because physical limitations might restrict their plans.

PAVING THE WAY by Alex Brun

As rural land shrinks and cities expand, many citizens are left questioning why our cities are growing outward rather than upward.

NEGLECTED COMPANIONS by Katie Scaief

Pets can provide their owners with affection and an escape from our intense world. Some pets, though, can become more of a problem than a relief when they are left alone for too long.

INSTANT GRATIFICATION by Carrie Meredith

Credit cards make it easy to acquire a wealth of material possessions. But, with these items come debt, stress and environmental damage.

SHIFTING GEARS by Jessica Stahl

Time is a precious commodity for many Americans. Yet millions of Americans waste time in traffic or circling the block looking for parking. Bicycle commuting might be a way to improve congestion and air quality while renewing family time and improving human health.

DONATED TIME by Ethan Brown

Volunteerism has steadily declined in the United States since the 1970s. In Whatcom County, however, it has risen because citizens realize the importance of their work in the community.

GLUED by Brendan McLaughlin

The television has become as common as a couch in most American living rooms. But, as people spend more hours in front of the tube, many question the effects of too much TV.

FULL TIME FAMILY by Andrea Boyle

With higher divorce rates and parents working longer hours, children are left at day-care facilities more than ever before. The increasing demands of being a full time employee cause many parents to replace their time with things.

‘HOME IMPROVEMENT’ by Alison Bickerstaff

As the number of chain stores increases across the country, local stores are feeling the pinch. Bellingham’s Hardware Sales seems to be doing well despite the addition of another competitor — Lowe’s Home Improvement Warehouse.

ATROPHY by Taylor Zajonc

As Americans spend more time at work, the ergonomic office chair has become part of the environment of the office worker. These chairs, however, are not the answer to physical problems.

WORK ETHIC: A day in the life of a CEO and an environmentalist by Helen Hollister

Jeffrey Utter and David Syre define themselves by their work. Utter has dedicated his life to sustainable living and solar energy. Syre has spent his life building the Trillium Corp. into an international business.

BARGAINING POWER by Matt McDonald

Although labor unions protect Americans from overwork and low wages, American workers log the most hours of any nation in the world. Without unions, workers would have no bargaining power and could be forced to work even longer hours.

A CHANGE OF PACE by Andy Aley

Convenience permeates all that Americans do, including eating. The Slow Food movement seeks to bring people back to their kitchens and tables and remind them where their food is coming from.

Description

Publication at Western Washington University

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. Any materials cited must be attributed to The Planet, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Publisher (Digital Object)

Resources made available by The Planet and Special Collections, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Subject-Topical (LCSH)

Human ecology – Washington (State)—Periodicals; Ecology—Washington (State) – Periodicals; Western Washington University--Students--Periodicals and Huxley College of the Environment -- Students --Periodicals.

Subject-Names (LCNAF)

Western Washington University; Huxley College of the Environment.

Geographic Coverage

Washington (State)

Disciplines

Environmental Sciences | Higher Education | Journalism Studies

Keywords

Huxley College of the Environment, Western Washington University, Student publication, Ecology, Environmental Studies

Format

application/pdf

Language

English

City

Bellingham, WA

The Planet, 2003, Spring

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