Poster Title

An Analysis of Urchin Harvesting at Tse-Whit-Zen Village

Research Mentor(s)

SarahCampbell

Affiliated Department

Anthropology

Sort Order

02

Start Date

14-5-2015 10:00 AM

End Date

14-5-2015 2:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

Research on marine resources indicates size-selective harvesting reduces the population size over time. Tse-Whit-Zen Village’s shell midden, on the Olympic Peninsula, has remains of two different urchin species used as food by early inhabitants. The remains are fragmented, making comparisons of body size over time impossible. The size of ossicles (in the urchin’s jaw) are linearly related to body size, but it is difficult to differentiate ossicle fragments by species. I measured 550 ossicles and statistically assigned them to species. I then examined the average size of each species over time to determine whether size-selective harvesting could be observed archaeologically.

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 14th, 10:00 AM May 14th, 2:00 PM

An Analysis of Urchin Harvesting at Tse-Whit-Zen Village

Anthropology

Research on marine resources indicates size-selective harvesting reduces the population size over time. Tse-Whit-Zen Village’s shell midden, on the Olympic Peninsula, has remains of two different urchin species used as food by early inhabitants. The remains are fragmented, making comparisons of body size over time impossible. The size of ossicles (in the urchin’s jaw) are linearly related to body size, but it is difficult to differentiate ossicle fragments by species. I measured 550 ossicles and statistically assigned them to species. I then examined the average size of each species over time to determine whether size-selective harvesting could be observed archaeologically.