Poster Title

Minaj à trois: Nicki Minaj, the Third Reich, and the power of celebrity

Research Mentor(s)

James Fortney

Affiliated Department

Communication Studies

Sort Order

30

Start Date

14-5-2015 10:00 AM

End Date

14-5-2015 2:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

Celebrities possess an unusually large amount of power and influence over the general population. This poster presents the ways in which celebrity power is created and utilized through the analysis of a lyric video for Nicki Minaj’s song, “Only,” which contains numerous allusions to Nazi Germany and the Holocaust. Minaj’s ability to produce offensive and seemingly anti-Semitic content comes from the power that comes from both being in the public eye and possessing a large amount of monetary wealth. Further, this research suggests that the motivation for creating content with so many hateful images stems from the desire to create controversy – something that celebrities notoriously have to power to do. The First Amendment protects the artists who created this video, making it difficult to distinguish whether the production of the video was ethical or unethical.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 14th, 10:00 AM May 14th, 2:00 PM

Minaj à trois: Nicki Minaj, the Third Reich, and the power of celebrity

Communication Studies

Celebrities possess an unusually large amount of power and influence over the general population. This poster presents the ways in which celebrity power is created and utilized through the analysis of a lyric video for Nicki Minaj’s song, “Only,” which contains numerous allusions to Nazi Germany and the Holocaust. Minaj’s ability to produce offensive and seemingly anti-Semitic content comes from the power that comes from both being in the public eye and possessing a large amount of monetary wealth. Further, this research suggests that the motivation for creating content with so many hateful images stems from the desire to create controversy – something that celebrities notoriously have to power to do. The First Amendment protects the artists who created this video, making it difficult to distinguish whether the production of the video was ethical or unethical.