Poster Title

Phytoremediation of arsenic contaminated soils using mustard plants: An examination of remediation potential in the presence of annelids and iron oxyhydroxides

Co-Author(s)

Ariana Dionisio, Scott Ford

Research Mentor(s)

Ruth Sofield

Affiliated Department

Environmental Sciences

Sort Order

35

Start Date

14-5-2015 10:00 AM

End Date

14-5-2015 2:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

Arsenic from agricultural application and geologic weathering is a contaminant of concern for many regions of Washington State. The behavior of As in the soil column has been shown to be heavily modulated by iron compounds also present in the soil. These iron particulates influence the concentration and subsequent availability of As in the soil by sorbing and desorbing As depending on the redox environment of the soil. Fe2O3·H2O is one abundant form of iron that both composes these particulates and has been shown to have a high bioavailability to microorganisms. The Fe(III) in these particulates can be metabolically reduced by microbial communities within the soil resulting in the de-sorption and release of As. In this study we will assess the toxicity and phytoremediation potential in locally collected soils using the mustard species Brassica juncea, a known As hyperaccumulator. Four soil treatments will be tested: untreated soil, soil treated with Fe2O3·H2O, soil treated with As, and soil treated with Fe2O3·H2O and As. Toxicity of the soils on annelids will be assessed after three weeks of exposure. Leachate will be collected from each treatment and analyzed for As and total Fe. As accumulation in B. juncea will be measured, along with total biomass production after three weeks. This work will be conducted as part of the Spring 2015 Science and Management of Contaminated Sites class at Western Washington University.

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 14th, 10:00 AM May 14th, 2:00 PM

Phytoremediation of arsenic contaminated soils using mustard plants: An examination of remediation potential in the presence of annelids and iron oxyhydroxides

Environmental Sciences

Arsenic from agricultural application and geologic weathering is a contaminant of concern for many regions of Washington State. The behavior of As in the soil column has been shown to be heavily modulated by iron compounds also present in the soil. These iron particulates influence the concentration and subsequent availability of As in the soil by sorbing and desorbing As depending on the redox environment of the soil. Fe2O3·H2O is one abundant form of iron that both composes these particulates and has been shown to have a high bioavailability to microorganisms. The Fe(III) in these particulates can be metabolically reduced by microbial communities within the soil resulting in the de-sorption and release of As. In this study we will assess the toxicity and phytoremediation potential in locally collected soils using the mustard species Brassica juncea, a known As hyperaccumulator. Four soil treatments will be tested: untreated soil, soil treated with Fe2O3·H2O, soil treated with As, and soil treated with Fe2O3·H2O and As. Toxicity of the soils on annelids will be assessed after three weeks of exposure. Leachate will be collected from each treatment and analyzed for As and total Fe. As accumulation in B. juncea will be measured, along with total biomass production after three weeks. This work will be conducted as part of the Spring 2015 Science and Management of Contaminated Sites class at Western Washington University.