Poster Title

An Assessment of the Effects of Marine Worms on the Long-term Efficacy of Activated Carbon

Co-Author(s)

Gunnar Guddal, Justin Meyer, Sam Carlos

Research Mentor(s)

Ruth Sofield

Affiliated Department

Environmental Sciences

Sort Order

03

Start Date

15-5-2015 10:00 AM

End Date

15-5-2015 2:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

Addition of activated carbon (AC) to contaminated sediment is used as a remedial technology to reduce the bioavailability of contaminants such as PCBs. However, the consumption of applied AC by marine worms has been proposed as a pathway that may reintroduce contamination into the marine environment. This proposed experiment will assess the effect of marine worm digestive fluid on the desorption of PCBs from AC. Experimental sediment containing AC and PCBs will be exposed to an artificial digestive fluid designed to mimic the digestive fluids of marine worms. Artificial benthic worm digestive fluid will be prepared according to the procedures of previous work using commercially available analytical chemicals representing surfactants and buffers. PCB concentrations in the artificial digestive fluid will be compared to a control (without artificial digestive fluids) to determine whether digestive conditions have affected PCBs desorption. If benthic organisms have an impact on sorption of PCBs to AC, then the long-term efficacy of AC for interrupting the exposure pathway between marine sediments and organisms may be compromised. If digestive fluids have no impact on the sorption of PCBs to AC, then AC should be upheld as an effective method for protecting marine life from PCBs. This work will be conducted as part of the Spring 2015 Science and Management of Contaminated Sites class at Western Washington University.

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May 15th, 10:00 AM May 15th, 2:00 PM

An Assessment of the Effects of Marine Worms on the Long-term Efficacy of Activated Carbon

Environmental Sciences

Addition of activated carbon (AC) to contaminated sediment is used as a remedial technology to reduce the bioavailability of contaminants such as PCBs. However, the consumption of applied AC by marine worms has been proposed as a pathway that may reintroduce contamination into the marine environment. This proposed experiment will assess the effect of marine worm digestive fluid on the desorption of PCBs from AC. Experimental sediment containing AC and PCBs will be exposed to an artificial digestive fluid designed to mimic the digestive fluids of marine worms. Artificial benthic worm digestive fluid will be prepared according to the procedures of previous work using commercially available analytical chemicals representing surfactants and buffers. PCB concentrations in the artificial digestive fluid will be compared to a control (without artificial digestive fluids) to determine whether digestive conditions have affected PCBs desorption. If benthic organisms have an impact on sorption of PCBs to AC, then the long-term efficacy of AC for interrupting the exposure pathway between marine sediments and organisms may be compromised. If digestive fluids have no impact on the sorption of PCBs to AC, then AC should be upheld as an effective method for protecting marine life from PCBs. This work will be conducted as part of the Spring 2015 Science and Management of Contaminated Sites class at Western Washington University.