Research Mentor(s)

Lee Gulyas

Affiliated Department

Canadian American Studies

Sort Order

05

Start Date

19-5-2016 9:00 AM

End Date

19-5-2016 12:00 PM

Keywords

Anne, Green Gables, Anne of Green Gables, Canada, Canadian Story, L.M. Montgomery, Prince Edward Island, Avonlea, Margaret Atwood

Document Type

Event

Abstract

The novel Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery (L.M. Montgomery) follows the touching story of Anne Shirley, a young rebellious red-headed orphan. Anne, who is mistakenly sent to siblings Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert, and is begrudgingly adopted. Through the quirky trials and tribulations that follow in the quiet provincial town of Avonlea, a story about childhood, personal growth, and the female experience begins to emerge. Anne of Green Gables presents three unique, distinct, and incredibly important narratives that have implications for today’s society. First, Anne acts as a proto-essentialist feminist. By explicitly rejecting the objectification and fetishtization of young girls, Anne is able to create space for herself and other young females to grow and learn. Secondly, Anne’s relationship with Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert demonstrates a need for society to give legitimacy to children and the genuine experiences they face. By doing so, the township of Avonlea is culturally transformed into one with greater compassion, empathy, and richness, and transforms ideas of childhood, the feminine, and family. Finally, Anne of Green Gables transforms the classic Canadian literature narrative of survival into a story about how to thrive in a community, against all odds.

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May 19th, 9:00 AM May 19th, 12:00 PM

Anne of Green Gables: Childhood, Feminism, and the Canadian story

Canadian American Studies

The novel Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery (L.M. Montgomery) follows the touching story of Anne Shirley, a young rebellious red-headed orphan. Anne, who is mistakenly sent to siblings Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert, and is begrudgingly adopted. Through the quirky trials and tribulations that follow in the quiet provincial town of Avonlea, a story about childhood, personal growth, and the female experience begins to emerge. Anne of Green Gables presents three unique, distinct, and incredibly important narratives that have implications for today’s society. First, Anne acts as a proto-essentialist feminist. By explicitly rejecting the objectification and fetishtization of young girls, Anne is able to create space for herself and other young females to grow and learn. Secondly, Anne’s relationship with Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert demonstrates a need for society to give legitimacy to children and the genuine experiences they face. By doing so, the township of Avonlea is culturally transformed into one with greater compassion, empathy, and richness, and transforms ideas of childhood, the feminine, and family. Finally, Anne of Green Gables transforms the classic Canadian literature narrative of survival into a story about how to thrive in a community, against all odds.

 

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