Research Mentor(s)

Merrill Peterson

Affiliated Department

Biology

Sort Order

07

Start Date

19-5-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

19-5-2016 3:00 PM

Keywords

Climate change, natural history, data, moths, PNW

Document Type

Event

Abstract

Climate change has driven shifts in phenology and distribution for many species. These effects are often idiosyncratic and it remains unclear whether they vary consistently among functional groups, limiting our ability to draw broad conclusions about how climate change affects species. Previous studies have indicated that Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) are sensitive to climate change. We analyzed a large database of moth specimen records from the Pacific Northwest (PNW) to examine climate change responses over more than 100 years for a suite of 241 functionally diverse species, including spring and fall active species as well as dietary generalists and specialists. Our goal was to investigate the effect of among-year variation in regional late winter to early spring temperatures on the seasonal timing of adult activity, and whether that effect differs among moth functional groups. We hypothesized that moths would have earlier flight dates in warmer years, and that this effect would be greatest for both early-season and dietary specialists.

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Included in

Biology Commons

Share

COinS
 
May 19th, 12:00 PM May 19th, 3:00 PM

Calculating the predictability of climate change: the effect of climate change on moth species in the Pacific Northwest varies among functional groups.

Biology

Climate change has driven shifts in phenology and distribution for many species. These effects are often idiosyncratic and it remains unclear whether they vary consistently among functional groups, limiting our ability to draw broad conclusions about how climate change affects species. Previous studies have indicated that Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) are sensitive to climate change. We analyzed a large database of moth specimen records from the Pacific Northwest (PNW) to examine climate change responses over more than 100 years for a suite of 241 functionally diverse species, including spring and fall active species as well as dietary generalists and specialists. Our goal was to investigate the effect of among-year variation in regional late winter to early spring temperatures on the seasonal timing of adult activity, and whether that effect differs among moth functional groups. We hypothesized that moths would have earlier flight dates in warmer years, and that this effect would be greatest for both early-season and dietary specialists.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.