Poster Title

A Hiker's Guide to Climate Trends and Natural Disaster along the Pacific Crest Trail

Research Mentor(s)

Aquila Flower

Affiliated Department

Environmental Studies

Sort Order

35

Start Date

17-5-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

17-5-2017 12:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

The Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) spans roughly 2,650 miles through a small part of Canada, Washington, Oregon, and California. More than 180 thru- hikers and countless other section hikers hike the PCT annually. Just about every year the PCT changes in length because of reroutes due to flooding, fire, or other natural disaster. Despite this being an increasingly popular hiking trail, there does not seem to be a map that displays landmarks of interest to hikers as well as information about the occurrence of natural disasters along the PCT and those subsequent impacts to communities of trees. I used Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software to highlight areas along the PCT where natural disasters have occurred. I also looked at climate trends over past years in the areas encompassing the PCT. These climate trends are extremely useful in predicting useable water sources especially in areas where water availability fluctuate in the summer months. I used GIS tools to map the locations of campgrounds, trailheads and water sources along the PCT as well. My research revealed common natural disasters along the whole length of the PCT as well as interesting climate trends in these areas. The research and information I have gathered will culminate into an interactive web map available to hikers to easily research information about the section they are about to hike, or to answer questions about something they observed while hiking the PCT.

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 17th, 9:00 AM May 17th, 12:00 PM

A Hiker's Guide to Climate Trends and Natural Disaster along the Pacific Crest Trail

Environmental Studies

The Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) spans roughly 2,650 miles through a small part of Canada, Washington, Oregon, and California. More than 180 thru- hikers and countless other section hikers hike the PCT annually. Just about every year the PCT changes in length because of reroutes due to flooding, fire, or other natural disaster. Despite this being an increasingly popular hiking trail, there does not seem to be a map that displays landmarks of interest to hikers as well as information about the occurrence of natural disasters along the PCT and those subsequent impacts to communities of trees. I used Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software to highlight areas along the PCT where natural disasters have occurred. I also looked at climate trends over past years in the areas encompassing the PCT. These climate trends are extremely useful in predicting useable water sources especially in areas where water availability fluctuate in the summer months. I used GIS tools to map the locations of campgrounds, trailheads and water sources along the PCT as well. My research revealed common natural disasters along the whole length of the PCT as well as interesting climate trends in these areas. The research and information I have gathered will culminate into an interactive web map available to hikers to easily research information about the section they are about to hike, or to answer questions about something they observed while hiking the PCT.