Poster Title

Predictive GIS Modeling of Landslide Susceptibility in the Salmon Drift Creek Watershed Council

Research Mentor(s)

Aquila Flower

Affiliated Department

Environmental Studies

Sort Order

58

Start Date

17-5-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

17-5-2017 3:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

Slope stability is often calculated using traditional “factor of safety” equations applied in engineering geology. Such equations contain variables that are difficult to quantify, including soil cohesion, root cohesion, and angle of internal friction. In an attempt to estimate landslide susceptibility in a more general sense, I have developed a GIS model that utilizes mainstream data to perform a multi-criteria stability analysis. The model includes variables such as slope grade, aspect, land cover, mean annual precipitation, road proximity, stream proximity, and fault proximity. I analyzed the slope stability of a coastal, mountainous watershed in northwestern Oregon. The Salmon-Drift Creek Watershed Council has a history of human-influenced landsliding associated with road cuts and logging. In the analysis, slope aspect and land cover types were assigned quantitative values. All datasets were normalized by maximum values, then weighted based on their influence on the landslide potential. The variable weights were determined from historical landslide causation in the study area and literature reviews of similar studies. My results suggest that the Salmon Drift Creek Watershed Council has a large number of unstable slopes due to over-saturated soils and large-scale logging practices.

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 17th, 12:00 PM May 17th, 3:00 PM

Predictive GIS Modeling of Landslide Susceptibility in the Salmon Drift Creek Watershed Council

Environmental Studies

Slope stability is often calculated using traditional “factor of safety” equations applied in engineering geology. Such equations contain variables that are difficult to quantify, including soil cohesion, root cohesion, and angle of internal friction. In an attempt to estimate landslide susceptibility in a more general sense, I have developed a GIS model that utilizes mainstream data to perform a multi-criteria stability analysis. The model includes variables such as slope grade, aspect, land cover, mean annual precipitation, road proximity, stream proximity, and fault proximity. I analyzed the slope stability of a coastal, mountainous watershed in northwestern Oregon. The Salmon-Drift Creek Watershed Council has a history of human-influenced landsliding associated with road cuts and logging. In the analysis, slope aspect and land cover types were assigned quantitative values. All datasets were normalized by maximum values, then weighted based on their influence on the landslide potential. The variable weights were determined from historical landslide causation in the study area and literature reviews of similar studies. My results suggest that the Salmon Drift Creek Watershed Council has a large number of unstable slopes due to over-saturated soils and large-scale logging practices.