Poster Title

Projected Steelhead Populations based on Stream Gauge measurements

Research Mentor(s)

Aquila Flower

Affiliated Department

Environmental Studies

Sort Order

59

Start Date

17-5-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

17-5-2017 3:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

The effects of increased discharge rates have a harmful effect on the local economy of the Pacific Northwest communities, and the habitats of various species of anadromous fish populations. The Lummi Nation and other local tribes along the PNW, have developed an economy that has been dependent on the health and return of fish (specifically salmon) for thousands of years. Native habitat populations of Steelhead, Summer Chum, and others within the Pacific Northwest are being stressed, and the number of returning anadromous salmon are decreasing as a result. Habitats of these species, are influenced by several different factors that can have deteriorating impacts on the habitats of these fish. The habitats where different species of salmon create redds to raise eggs are susceptible to many different outside factors that affect their overall health and development including: precipitation, pH, water temperature, air temperature, discharge rate, suspended sediment count (ssc), and visibility. The focus of this study area include the Nooksack and Skagit Valley watershed areas, and possibly other nearby communities known to have anadromous fish habitats. Species of fish include the Chinook, Bull Trout, and Steelhead (threatened). The fish listed require specific physical features that create a suitable habitat and are being transformed by urban and rural development (Thompson, 2016). The changing climate also accounts for fish habitats being put under a significant amount of stress such as increased air and water temperatures, ground water temperature, the amount of shade near Redds, physical barriers (Culverts, levees, seawalls, etc.). This report will pay close attention to data provided by nonprofit organizations and government agencies to give accurate results in Arcmap of different streams from a National Hydrography Dataset (NHD flow) based on measurements recorded on stream gauges every hour. The goal is to pinpoint areas within the watersheds that have been put under stress from different environmental factors, and require immediate attention.

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 17th, 12:00 PM May 17th, 3:00 PM

Projected Steelhead Populations based on Stream Gauge measurements

Environmental Studies

The effects of increased discharge rates have a harmful effect on the local economy of the Pacific Northwest communities, and the habitats of various species of anadromous fish populations. The Lummi Nation and other local tribes along the PNW, have developed an economy that has been dependent on the health and return of fish (specifically salmon) for thousands of years. Native habitat populations of Steelhead, Summer Chum, and others within the Pacific Northwest are being stressed, and the number of returning anadromous salmon are decreasing as a result. Habitats of these species, are influenced by several different factors that can have deteriorating impacts on the habitats of these fish. The habitats where different species of salmon create redds to raise eggs are susceptible to many different outside factors that affect their overall health and development including: precipitation, pH, water temperature, air temperature, discharge rate, suspended sediment count (ssc), and visibility. The focus of this study area include the Nooksack and Skagit Valley watershed areas, and possibly other nearby communities known to have anadromous fish habitats. Species of fish include the Chinook, Bull Trout, and Steelhead (threatened). The fish listed require specific physical features that create a suitable habitat and are being transformed by urban and rural development (Thompson, 2016). The changing climate also accounts for fish habitats being put under a significant amount of stress such as increased air and water temperatures, ground water temperature, the amount of shade near Redds, physical barriers (Culverts, levees, seawalls, etc.). This report will pay close attention to data provided by nonprofit organizations and government agencies to give accurate results in Arcmap of different streams from a National Hydrography Dataset (NHD flow) based on measurements recorded on stream gauges every hour. The goal is to pinpoint areas within the watersheds that have been put under stress from different environmental factors, and require immediate attention.