Poster Title

Identifying Social Hierarchies within Organizational Communication

Research Mentor(s)

Rita Daniels

Affiliated Department

Media and Communication

Sort Order

38

Start Date

17-5-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

17-5-2017 12:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

This study identified the hierarchical structure established through the social communicative practices within the Bellingham Marriott hotels. The cultural elements of informal rules, organizational communication styles, heroes, outlaws, and stories were reviewed and their role in the creation of social hierarchy were examined. Through stratified random sampling, participants completed a survey that assessed the communication practices amongnon-managerial level organizational members. The purpose of this study was to understand the hierarchical structure created among employees in a social parameter and identify a framework for social dominance derived from workplace communication. Findings revealed that departments that work directly with customers, and employees who were characterized as gossips had a high social capital and a higher hierarchical status.

Comments

Outstanding Poster Award Recipient

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 17th, 9:00 AM May 17th, 12:00 PM

Identifying Social Hierarchies within Organizational Communication

Media and Communication

This study identified the hierarchical structure established through the social communicative practices within the Bellingham Marriott hotels. The cultural elements of informal rules, organizational communication styles, heroes, outlaws, and stories were reviewed and their role in the creation of social hierarchy were examined. Through stratified random sampling, participants completed a survey that assessed the communication practices amongnon-managerial level organizational members. The purpose of this study was to understand the hierarchical structure created among employees in a social parameter and identify a framework for social dominance derived from workplace communication. Findings revealed that departments that work directly with customers, and employees who were characterized as gossips had a high social capital and a higher hierarchical status.