Poster Title

A Critique of Conflict Management Style Usage Within Communication Research

Research Mentor(s)

Ee Lin Lee

Affiliated Department

Media and Communication

Sort Order

15

Start Date

17-5-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

17-5-2017 12:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

The objective of this piece is to critique the use of the five main conflict management styles: dominating, integrating, obliging, compromising, and avoiding within communication research. We analyzed past research findings, describing the use of the dualistic framework of individualism and collectivism and how these create generalizations about cultures and communication patterns. Furthermore, we describe the components of concern, detailing concern for self and concern for others and the various conflict management styles associated with each. Additionally, we identified various strengths within the theory, such as the recognition of ethnocentric tendencies, the tools to participate in self-reflection, and the acknowledgement of variability with the use of a variety of theories. We critiqued various weaknesses of the theory such as the polarization of the two dimensions of individualism and collectivism, which creates an either/or dynamic of the different styles, the appropriateness of the research instruments, and the ecological validity of the participant's responses.

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 17th, 9:00 AM May 17th, 12:00 PM

A Critique of Conflict Management Style Usage Within Communication Research

Media and Communication

The objective of this piece is to critique the use of the five main conflict management styles: dominating, integrating, obliging, compromising, and avoiding within communication research. We analyzed past research findings, describing the use of the dualistic framework of individualism and collectivism and how these create generalizations about cultures and communication patterns. Furthermore, we describe the components of concern, detailing concern for self and concern for others and the various conflict management styles associated with each. Additionally, we identified various strengths within the theory, such as the recognition of ethnocentric tendencies, the tools to participate in self-reflection, and the acknowledgement of variability with the use of a variety of theories. We critiqued various weaknesses of the theory such as the polarization of the two dimensions of individualism and collectivism, which creates an either/or dynamic of the different styles, the appropriateness of the research instruments, and the ecological validity of the participant's responses.