Ergonomic Surgical Body Support System

Allyce Froning, Western Washington University
Kyla Sumpter, Western Washington University

Abstract

Awkward surgeons’ body posture during surgical procedure is one of the main ergonomics problems in the Operating Rooms (OR). Prolonged static head, neck and back posture in a standing position causes fatigue, aches, and pain to the supporting muscles. Due to the position of the patient during surgeries, surgeons usually lean forward to control work in the surgical area. This posture results in increased muscles activity in the upper and lower body to keep the surgeon balanced. This type of muscle activity increases the incidence of Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs) among surgeons over time. In addition, surgeons rely on their hands and fingers to perform precision procedures which add more stress to their muscles. Various forms of research have been gathered thus far, including research articles supporting the need for such a device and current models and solutions. From this, a questionnaire was created and distributed to surgeons. From the responses acquired, all the information collected will be used to assess and propose various designs to determine the safest surgical body support system. The engineering design process will be implemented to develop the design concepts. Computer Added Design (CAD) will be used to simulate and test the various designs. Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) will be used to evaluate surgeon’s posture while performing surgery using the simulated designs. Results will help make scientifically supported decisions about the safest surgical support system that can be used by surgeons in the OR.

 
May 18th, 9:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 PM

Ergonomic Surgical Body Support System

Industrial and Product Design

Awkward surgeons’ body posture during surgical procedure is one of the main ergonomics problems in the Operating Rooms (OR). Prolonged static head, neck and back posture in a standing position causes fatigue, aches, and pain to the supporting muscles. Due to the position of the patient during surgeries, surgeons usually lean forward to control work in the surgical area. This posture results in increased muscles activity in the upper and lower body to keep the surgeon balanced. This type of muscle activity increases the incidence of Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs) among surgeons over time. In addition, surgeons rely on their hands and fingers to perform precision procedures which add more stress to their muscles. Various forms of research have been gathered thus far, including research articles supporting the need for such a device and current models and solutions. From this, a questionnaire was created and distributed to surgeons. From the responses acquired, all the information collected will be used to assess and propose various designs to determine the safest surgical body support system. The engineering design process will be implemented to develop the design concepts. Computer Added Design (CAD) will be used to simulate and test the various designs. Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) will be used to evaluate surgeon’s posture while performing surgery using the simulated designs. Results will help make scientifically supported decisions about the safest surgical support system that can be used by surgeons in the OR.