Poster Title

Noise pollution impact on songbird behavior

Research Mentor(s)

John McLaughlin

Affiliated Department

Environmental Sciences

Sort Order

44

Start Date

18-5-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

18-5-2017 12:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

Title: Noise pollution impact on songbird behavior This study examines impact of noise pollution on songbirds particularly territorial singing. Anthropogenic noise associated with expanding human development can reduce effectiveness of territorial singing, which is important to songbird reproductive success. With an increase in human presence, the success of songbirds’ calls will be negatively impacted due to competition with other sources of noise. We evaluated noise impacts by comparing songbird vocalizations in similar forested sites adjacent to vs. distant from Interstate-5. We compared background singing rates and songbird responses to broadcasts of pre-recorded songs of the same species. Species-specific responses were measured by percent of individuals responding and response times. Data on background singing and playback responses were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance.These results reveal implications of urban and transportation planning on valuable wildlife in a rapidly urbanizing region.

Comments

Outstanding Poster Award Recipient

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 18th, 9:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 PM

Noise pollution impact on songbird behavior

Environmental Sciences

Title: Noise pollution impact on songbird behavior This study examines impact of noise pollution on songbirds particularly territorial singing. Anthropogenic noise associated with expanding human development can reduce effectiveness of territorial singing, which is important to songbird reproductive success. With an increase in human presence, the success of songbirds’ calls will be negatively impacted due to competition with other sources of noise. We evaluated noise impacts by comparing songbird vocalizations in similar forested sites adjacent to vs. distant from Interstate-5. We compared background singing rates and songbird responses to broadcasts of pre-recorded songs of the same species. Species-specific responses were measured by percent of individuals responding and response times. Data on background singing and playback responses were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance.These results reveal implications of urban and transportation planning on valuable wildlife in a rapidly urbanizing region.