Poster Title

Mobilization of arsenic from biotic disturbances in organoclay amended sediments.

Co-Author(s)

Kyle Jiganti, Ian Moran, Eric Lawrence, Edward Bain, Miranda Aiken

Research Mentor(s)

Ruth Sofield

Affiliated Department

Environmental Sciences

Sort Order

41

Start Date

18-5-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

18-5-2017 12:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

Organoclay (OC) amendments have been proposed as an effective remedial technology for in-situ sediment cleanup involving inorganic contaminants, such as arsenic. OC acts as a sorbent to sequester and immobilize the contaminants. It is speculated that synthetic worm gastric juice (SWGJ) may increase the mobility of contaminants in the sediment. This study will simulate natural biotic disturbance using SWGJ in batch partitioning experiments under laboratory conditions. The partitioning of arsenic (as arsenate) between two phases will be analyzed using an ICP-MS. A higher concentration of arsenic is expected to be measured in the water column and sediment treatments that include SWGJ, which will indicate that desorption has occurred. This novel study will provide us with partitioning coefficients for arsenic in treated sediments, which will provide us with insight towards the bioavailability of contaminants to fish and other organisms.

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 18th, 9:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 PM

Mobilization of arsenic from biotic disturbances in organoclay amended sediments.

Environmental Sciences

Organoclay (OC) amendments have been proposed as an effective remedial technology for in-situ sediment cleanup involving inorganic contaminants, such as arsenic. OC acts as a sorbent to sequester and immobilize the contaminants. It is speculated that synthetic worm gastric juice (SWGJ) may increase the mobility of contaminants in the sediment. This study will simulate natural biotic disturbance using SWGJ in batch partitioning experiments under laboratory conditions. The partitioning of arsenic (as arsenate) between two phases will be analyzed using an ICP-MS. A higher concentration of arsenic is expected to be measured in the water column and sediment treatments that include SWGJ, which will indicate that desorption has occurred. This novel study will provide us with partitioning coefficients for arsenic in treated sediments, which will provide us with insight towards the bioavailability of contaminants to fish and other organisms.