Research Mentor(s)

Aquila Flower

Affiliated Department

Environmental Studies

Sort Order

17

Start Date

18-5-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

18-5-2017 12:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

According to the latest federal report, released in the final days of Barack Obama’s administration, the global average sea level rise was predicted to reach 8.2 feet by 2100 in the “extreme” scenario—a much faster rate than previously thought. 8.2 feet of sea level rise would put much of America’s east coast underwater. NOAA released the report days before the inauguration of Donald Trump—an event which no doubt did not bode well for Earth’s climate. Since his inauguration, President Trump has thoroughly proven his disbelief in climate change by making his best attempt to undo all of Obama’s climate policies, from the comfort of his new home not far from the Potomac River. Given these circumstances, it should be imperative to investigate the effects of the United States’ new policies on the vulnerability of the densely populated areas along the largest and most productive estuary in North America—the Chesapeake Bay. In this study, I conducted a multi-criteria analysis on the vulnerability of populations living along the Chesapeake Bay watershed. My main focus was mapping sea level rise, and then taking into account other factors which could contribute to vulnerability, including seasonal flood patterns and past natural hazard events. My results represent a realistic demonstration of what this region of the US may come to look like in coming years, taking into account sea level rise as well as other hazards and factors of vulnerability. Regardless of the denial of anthropogenic climate change that many Americans maintain, extensive damage is likely in this region. My probabilistic maps and study on vulnerability should be used to inform people in this region of the risks they face by living there.

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 18th, 9:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 PM

Climate Implications on the Vulnerability of Populated Areas Along the Chesapeake Bay

Environmental Studies

According to the latest federal report, released in the final days of Barack Obama’s administration, the global average sea level rise was predicted to reach 8.2 feet by 2100 in the “extreme” scenario—a much faster rate than previously thought. 8.2 feet of sea level rise would put much of America’s east coast underwater. NOAA released the report days before the inauguration of Donald Trump—an event which no doubt did not bode well for Earth’s climate. Since his inauguration, President Trump has thoroughly proven his disbelief in climate change by making his best attempt to undo all of Obama’s climate policies, from the comfort of his new home not far from the Potomac River. Given these circumstances, it should be imperative to investigate the effects of the United States’ new policies on the vulnerability of the densely populated areas along the largest and most productive estuary in North America—the Chesapeake Bay. In this study, I conducted a multi-criteria analysis on the vulnerability of populations living along the Chesapeake Bay watershed. My main focus was mapping sea level rise, and then taking into account other factors which could contribute to vulnerability, including seasonal flood patterns and past natural hazard events. My results represent a realistic demonstration of what this region of the US may come to look like in coming years, taking into account sea level rise as well as other hazards and factors of vulnerability. Regardless of the denial of anthropogenic climate change that many Americans maintain, extensive damage is likely in this region. My probabilistic maps and study on vulnerability should be used to inform people in this region of the risks they face by living there.

 

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