Co-Author(s)

Ed Cloutis (University of Winnipeg), Dan Applin (University of Winnipeg)

Research Mentor(s)

Melissa Rice

Affiliated Department

Geology

Sort Order

52

Start Date

18-5-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

18-5-2017 12:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

In order to better understand the reactions that form intercalated clays in carbonaceous chondritic (CC) meteorites, a suite of six combinations of nontronite plus fine-grained metal, organics, or sulfur ± water were heated at a temperature of 200°C in sealed Parr bomb containers for a period of three months. Intercalation is the process of materials being introduced between the layers of expandable clays via cation exchange. Reflectance spectra of CC meteorites differ from those of mixtures of the end members made physically in that the CC spectra are darker and show extremely subdued absorption bands of the phyllosilicates (clays) that they contain relative to the mechanical mixtures. This is likely due to the fact that the clays in CCs contain darkening agents, such as organics, magnetite, iron sulfides in intimate association with the clays (i.e., between individual phyllosilicate sheets) that a mechanical mixture cannot reproduce.

Comments

Outstanding Poster Award Recipient

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
May 18th, 9:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 PM

Recreating Intercalated Clays of Chondritic Meteorites

Geology

In order to better understand the reactions that form intercalated clays in carbonaceous chondritic (CC) meteorites, a suite of six combinations of nontronite plus fine-grained metal, organics, or sulfur ± water were heated at a temperature of 200°C in sealed Parr bomb containers for a period of three months. Intercalation is the process of materials being introduced between the layers of expandable clays via cation exchange. Reflectance spectra of CC meteorites differ from those of mixtures of the end members made physically in that the CC spectra are darker and show extremely subdued absorption bands of the phyllosilicates (clays) that they contain relative to the mechanical mixtures. This is likely due to the fact that the clays in CCs contain darkening agents, such as organics, magnetite, iron sulfides in intimate association with the clays (i.e., between individual phyllosilicate sheets) that a mechanical mixture cannot reproduce.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.