Research Mentor(s)

Kathy Van Alstyne

Affiliated Department

Marine Biology

Sort Order

20

Start Date

18-5-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

18-5-2017 12:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

In the past, the indigenous people of the Salish Sea relied on a variety of edible seaweeds as a food source. Some of these seaweeds contain biologically active compounds including fucoidans and alginates that have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergy, anti-tumor, anti-obesity, anti-coagulant, and anti-viral properties. This project will take advantage of seaweed samples harvested from the Salish Sea region that were used for measurements of toxin content. Although these seaweeds contain toxins they also have numerous health benefits that likely outweigh the detrimental effects of the toxins. In order to better understand the health benefits of consuming these traditionally harvested seaweeds, I propose to quantify the concentrations of fucoidan, alginate, and protein in the same seaweed samples used in the toxin project.

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 18th, 9:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 PM

Determination of fucoidan, alginate, and protein concentrations in edible seaweeds from the Salish Sea Region

Marine Biology

In the past, the indigenous people of the Salish Sea relied on a variety of edible seaweeds as a food source. Some of these seaweeds contain biologically active compounds including fucoidans and alginates that have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergy, anti-tumor, anti-obesity, anti-coagulant, and anti-viral properties. This project will take advantage of seaweed samples harvested from the Salish Sea region that were used for measurements of toxin content. Although these seaweeds contain toxins they also have numerous health benefits that likely outweigh the detrimental effects of the toxins. In order to better understand the health benefits of consuming these traditionally harvested seaweeds, I propose to quantify the concentrations of fucoidan, alginate, and protein in the same seaweed samples used in the toxin project.

 

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