Research Mentor(s)

Joan Stevenson

Affiliated Department

Anthropology

Sort Order

50

Start Date

18-5-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

18-5-2017 3:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

Daubentonia madagascariensis (aye-aye) population numbers are declining across the island of Madagascar. This species evolved with truly unique adaptations such as continuously growing incisors, an unusual finger joint and use of echolocation, all supporting an early separation of the aye-aye from its closest relatives the lemurs. Local beliefs associate this species with death, causing them to be killed. Additionally, habitat destruction hastens their disappearance from much of Madagascar. The goal of this study was to gather direct or circumstantial evidence using first-hand accounts to locate their presence in Ranomafana National Park. Sightings are rare but their dietary habitats indicate their continued presence.

Comments

Outstanding Poster Award Recipient

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 18th, 12:00 PM May 18th, 3:00 PM

Presence of Daubentonia madagascariensis in Vatoharanana at Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar

Anthropology

Daubentonia madagascariensis (aye-aye) population numbers are declining across the island of Madagascar. This species evolved with truly unique adaptations such as continuously growing incisors, an unusual finger joint and use of echolocation, all supporting an early separation of the aye-aye from its closest relatives the lemurs. Local beliefs associate this species with death, causing them to be killed. Additionally, habitat destruction hastens their disappearance from much of Madagascar. The goal of this study was to gather direct or circumstantial evidence using first-hand accounts to locate their presence in Ranomafana National Park. Sightings are rare but their dietary habitats indicate their continued presence.

 

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