Poster Title

Molecular and Behavioral Effects of In-Utero Stress on Subsequent Generations of Caenorhabditis elegans

Co-Author(s)

Lauren Beane

Research Mentor(s)

Jackie Rose

Affiliated Department

Behavioral Neuroscience

Sort Order

43

Start Date

18-5-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

18-5-2017 12:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

Previous studies have implicated that in-utero stress can result in neuronal loss, memory deficits, and depression in adult rats. Other studies have proposed that maternal stress during pregnancy can cause epigenetic changes in the offspring associated with increased risk for anxiety disorders and autism. This likely occurs because of an elevation in glutamate receptors, such as the NMDA and AMPA receptors. Therefore, it is suggested that in-utero stressors in Caenorhabditis elegans acts via glutamate receptors, resulting in behavioral abnormalities. In the current study, this was tested by exposing wild-type N2 C. elegans to constant and repetitive motion stress for the duration of in-utero development (approximately 3 hours). Worms were then bleached to harvest embryos and adult offspring were examined for number of spontaneous reversals performed over a ten minute period. Worms that experienced in-utero stress showed significantly fewer spontaneously reversals than their control counterparts. Research in rats has suggested that stress increases the release of glutamate in the female dams and crosses the placental barrier resulting in the same effect in offspring. To study this effect in C. elegans, qRT-PCR was performed on adult offspring that had experience in utero stress to quantify GLR-1 glutamate receptor (AMPA) expression.These data together support what is known about the effects of stress in utero and provide a foundation for studying affected pathways and behavioral outcomes across generations in C. elegans.

Rights

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Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 18th, 9:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 PM

Molecular and Behavioral Effects of In-Utero Stress on Subsequent Generations of Caenorhabditis elegans

Behavioral Neuroscience

Previous studies have implicated that in-utero stress can result in neuronal loss, memory deficits, and depression in adult rats. Other studies have proposed that maternal stress during pregnancy can cause epigenetic changes in the offspring associated with increased risk for anxiety disorders and autism. This likely occurs because of an elevation in glutamate receptors, such as the NMDA and AMPA receptors. Therefore, it is suggested that in-utero stressors in Caenorhabditis elegans acts via glutamate receptors, resulting in behavioral abnormalities. In the current study, this was tested by exposing wild-type N2 C. elegans to constant and repetitive motion stress for the duration of in-utero development (approximately 3 hours). Worms were then bleached to harvest embryos and adult offspring were examined for number of spontaneous reversals performed over a ten minute period. Worms that experienced in-utero stress showed significantly fewer spontaneously reversals than their control counterparts. Research in rats has suggested that stress increases the release of glutamate in the female dams and crosses the placental barrier resulting in the same effect in offspring. To study this effect in C. elegans, qRT-PCR was performed on adult offspring that had experience in utero stress to quantify GLR-1 glutamate receptor (AMPA) expression.These data together support what is known about the effects of stress in utero and provide a foundation for studying affected pathways and behavioral outcomes across generations in C. elegans.