Poster Title

Lead sorption in aquatic environments

Co-Author(s)

Eddie Kramarevsky, Charlie Christenson, Miranda Aiken, Ed Bain, Ruth Sofield

Research Mentor(s)

Ruth Sofield

Affiliated Department

Environmental Sciences

Sort Order

38

Start Date

18-5-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

18-5-2017 3:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

Lead is released into the environment from various anthropogenic sources. It can have toxic neurological, developmental, and reproductive effect to humans and other organisms upon exposure. Lead has be found in a large number of aquatic contaminated sites across the United States, and there are efforts to reduce the likelihood of exposure. When lead is sorbed to sediment, it becomes less bioavailable and therefore less likely to produce toxic effects. Adding amendments, such as apatite and organoclay, to the sediment has been the new way of further reducing the exposure and toxicity of contaminants. This study compares the effectiveness of three different sediment amendments in sorbing lead. The lead in the sediment and the lead in the water exist in an equilibrium; the amount of time to reach equilibrium is relevant because lead and other contaminants move quickly in aquatic environments. This makes the interaction between the amendment and contaminant brief. This experiment focuses on the time-to-equilibrium for the basis of comparison among treatments at multiple lead concentrations. Site cleanup personnel look for an amendment that will sorb a large quantity of lead and do so quickly. This work provides data that can help to improve contaminated site cleanups in the future.

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 18th, 12:00 PM May 18th, 3:00 PM

Lead sorption in aquatic environments

Environmental Sciences

Lead is released into the environment from various anthropogenic sources. It can have toxic neurological, developmental, and reproductive effect to humans and other organisms upon exposure. Lead has be found in a large number of aquatic contaminated sites across the United States, and there are efforts to reduce the likelihood of exposure. When lead is sorbed to sediment, it becomes less bioavailable and therefore less likely to produce toxic effects. Adding amendments, such as apatite and organoclay, to the sediment has been the new way of further reducing the exposure and toxicity of contaminants. This study compares the effectiveness of three different sediment amendments in sorbing lead. The lead in the sediment and the lead in the water exist in an equilibrium; the amount of time to reach equilibrium is relevant because lead and other contaminants move quickly in aquatic environments. This makes the interaction between the amendment and contaminant brief. This experiment focuses on the time-to-equilibrium for the basis of comparison among treatments at multiple lead concentrations. Site cleanup personnel look for an amendment that will sorb a large quantity of lead and do so quickly. This work provides data that can help to improve contaminated site cleanups in the future.