Poster Title

Lead sorption constants in organoclay, activated carbon, apatite, and freshwater sediment

Co-Author(s)

Rita Foth, Dylan White, Miranda Aiken, Ed Bain, Ruth Sofield

Research Mentor(s)

Ruth Sofield

Affiliated Department

Environmental Sciences

Sort Order

37

Start Date

18-5-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

18-5-2017 3:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

Lead is one of many metals that is known to cause toxicological harm to aquatic organisms at environmentally relevant concentrations. Historically lead has been released to the aquatic environment through industrial, consumer, and gasoline products. Within the aquatic environment sediment typically sorbs lead and other metals, which reduces the bioavailability to aquatic organisms. Our experiment is a benchtop scale determination of sorption constants (Kd) between lead spiked water and four different sorbents (sediment, activated carbon, apatite, organoclay). The experimental goal is to produce sorption constants (Kd) for different treatments and compare the lead binding abilities of each treatment. The use of each treatment is applicable to large scale sediment remediation projects and will be useful in comparing which treatment will be best to use in remediating lead pollution.

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 18th, 12:00 PM May 18th, 3:00 PM

Lead sorption constants in organoclay, activated carbon, apatite, and freshwater sediment

Environmental Sciences

Lead is one of many metals that is known to cause toxicological harm to aquatic organisms at environmentally relevant concentrations. Historically lead has been released to the aquatic environment through industrial, consumer, and gasoline products. Within the aquatic environment sediment typically sorbs lead and other metals, which reduces the bioavailability to aquatic organisms. Our experiment is a benchtop scale determination of sorption constants (Kd) between lead spiked water and four different sorbents (sediment, activated carbon, apatite, organoclay). The experimental goal is to produce sorption constants (Kd) for different treatments and compare the lead binding abilities of each treatment. The use of each treatment is applicable to large scale sediment remediation projects and will be useful in comparing which treatment will be best to use in remediating lead pollution.