Poster Title

The Arctic's shrinking sea ice gives way to increasingly navigable shipping corridors: GIS based analysis by satellite imagery and radar observation

Research Mentor(s)

Aquila Flower

Affiliated Department

Environmental Studies

Sort Order

07

Start Date

18-5-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

18-5-2017 3:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

Changing Arctic sea ice affects annual trading seasons by increasing navigability of the Arctic Circle. A comprehensive assessment of shipping in the Arctic was conducted following recognition of the significant changes to governance, climate and resource development in the region. The changes in annual maximum growth of sea ice in the Arctic is difficult to predict, which puts ships at a disadvantage when planning when to traverse the ocean. Ongoing analysis of sea ice’s potential change to navigability each season can improve traversing the newly extended trading seasons. This analysis uses GIS methods to analyze recorded historic sea ice extents compared to more recently recorded satellite and radar data to explore changes to the most likely path of least resistance. This research revealed interesting patterns in international trade seasonality for Northern nations as well as potential effects of increased travel through sea ice growth and recession cycle. Many ships require ice crushers for travel along certain Arctic routes, which disrupts the formation of new thick sea ice in the freezing process. Providing real time satellite sea ice information could direct ships to the path of least resistance, avoiding thick ice as well as icebergs and ice bridges. My results prove that continuing analysis and communication with ships can be provided by satellite and aircraft radar observations to identify the shortest path of lease resistance, reduce disturbance to growing sea ice, and reduce the need for ice breaker ships.

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 18th, 12:00 PM May 18th, 3:00 PM

The Arctic's shrinking sea ice gives way to increasingly navigable shipping corridors: GIS based analysis by satellite imagery and radar observation

Environmental Studies

Changing Arctic sea ice affects annual trading seasons by increasing navigability of the Arctic Circle. A comprehensive assessment of shipping in the Arctic was conducted following recognition of the significant changes to governance, climate and resource development in the region. The changes in annual maximum growth of sea ice in the Arctic is difficult to predict, which puts ships at a disadvantage when planning when to traverse the ocean. Ongoing analysis of sea ice’s potential change to navigability each season can improve traversing the newly extended trading seasons. This analysis uses GIS methods to analyze recorded historic sea ice extents compared to more recently recorded satellite and radar data to explore changes to the most likely path of least resistance. This research revealed interesting patterns in international trade seasonality for Northern nations as well as potential effects of increased travel through sea ice growth and recession cycle. Many ships require ice crushers for travel along certain Arctic routes, which disrupts the formation of new thick sea ice in the freezing process. Providing real time satellite sea ice information could direct ships to the path of least resistance, avoiding thick ice as well as icebergs and ice bridges. My results prove that continuing analysis and communication with ships can be provided by satellite and aircraft radar observations to identify the shortest path of lease resistance, reduce disturbance to growing sea ice, and reduce the need for ice breaker ships.