Poster Title

Effects of Demographic and Geographic Factors on Natural Hazard Fatalities Within Southeast Asia

Research Mentor(s)

Aquila Flower

Affiliated Department

Environmental Studies

Sort Order

24

Start Date

18-5-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

18-5-2017 3:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

As a region, Southeast Asia is particularly known for the vicious natural hazards that plague its citizens. However, many people are unsure of why these hazards have effects of such magnitude. Through this project, I am working to help to explain why countries within Southeast Asia, such as Indonesia and the Philippines, have experienced so many fatalities from natural hazards. These countries experience many kinds of natural hazards, such as flooding, mudslides, tsunamis, and intense storms. Using factors such as population density, median age, and rural population, I analyzed why certain countries were more prone to experience mass casualties from these hazards. I attempted to standardize each country based on its geographic location given that some countries were closer to tectonic plate boundaries or were longer, narrower countries, which could affect the resulting fatalities from hazards such as tsunamis. In addition, I used geographically weighted regression to further analyze the effects that these factors had on fatalities through the correlation of each factor. I found that each factor had a different influence on the cause of fatalities within each country. Furthermore, I found that government hazard management policy within each country could have an effect on fatality rates form natural hazards. Analyzing all of this data shed light on how countries within Southeast Asia are affected by natural hazards and the drastic consequences that can emerge from them. Overall, these insights can help people to understand the effects of hazards within Southeast Asia and the root causes of resulting fatalities.

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 18th, 12:00 PM May 18th, 3:00 PM

Effects of Demographic and Geographic Factors on Natural Hazard Fatalities Within Southeast Asia

Environmental Studies

As a region, Southeast Asia is particularly known for the vicious natural hazards that plague its citizens. However, many people are unsure of why these hazards have effects of such magnitude. Through this project, I am working to help to explain why countries within Southeast Asia, such as Indonesia and the Philippines, have experienced so many fatalities from natural hazards. These countries experience many kinds of natural hazards, such as flooding, mudslides, tsunamis, and intense storms. Using factors such as population density, median age, and rural population, I analyzed why certain countries were more prone to experience mass casualties from these hazards. I attempted to standardize each country based on its geographic location given that some countries were closer to tectonic plate boundaries or were longer, narrower countries, which could affect the resulting fatalities from hazards such as tsunamis. In addition, I used geographically weighted regression to further analyze the effects that these factors had on fatalities through the correlation of each factor. I found that each factor had a different influence on the cause of fatalities within each country. Furthermore, I found that government hazard management policy within each country could have an effect on fatality rates form natural hazards. Analyzing all of this data shed light on how countries within Southeast Asia are affected by natural hazards and the drastic consequences that can emerge from them. Overall, these insights can help people to understand the effects of hazards within Southeast Asia and the root causes of resulting fatalities.