Abstract Title

Session S-01G: New Strategies for Shorelines

Presenter/Author Information

Kollin Higgins, King County (Wash.)Follow

Keywords

Shorelines

Start Date

30-4-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

30-4-2014 12:00 PM

Description

Boat based surveys were undertaken of the 92 miles of marine shoreline of Watershed Resource Inventory Area 9 (WRIA 9) in 2012 and 2013. The intent of the surveys was to collect shoreline condition data in order to update and compare baseline monitoring data sets as well as evaluate if the changes in condition were permitted. The survey in 2012 found 85 distinct changes in shoreline condition throughout the WRIA had occurred between 2004 and 2012. Changes associated with shoreline armoring accounted for 60% of the changes noted, with most changes being repairs to existing shoreline armoring infrastructure. The survey in 2013 found 60 distinct changes in shoreline condition occurred between 2012 and 2013. Only 33% of the changes were associated with shoreline armoring. In 2012, only 18 (20%) of the changes observed were permitted prior to the work being done. The compliance rate within each jurisdiction varied from 0 to 100%, with an average rate across all jurisdictions of 34%. Based on 2013 data from 4 of the 6 jurisdictions, 19 (40%) of the changes observed were permitted prior to the work being done. The compliance rate within each jurisdiction varied from 0 to 73%, with an average rate across all jurisdictions of 40%. A coarse level evaluation of the ecological and physical effects of changes was completed for all of the changes noted. In 2012, 34 (40%) of the changes encountered did not seem to have any obvious physical or ecological effects. In 2013, 23 (38%) of the changes encountered did not seem to have any physical or ecological effect. When comparing baseline conditions to existing conditions, there has been relatively little change in the overall amount of shoreline armoring within WRIA 9. This is because most of the changes noted to shoreline armoring were repairs or rebuilds to existing structures versus new structures and because the increase in new shoreline armoring was offset by restoration projects that have occurred since 2004. When comparing baseline vegetation conditions to existing conditions there has been a steady loss of treed areas over time. The surveys found that roughly 3 acres in 2012 and 2.5 acres in 2013 were cleared of trees and shrubs. The majority of these instances were unpermitted and occurred on Vashon and Maury Islands. It is clear that many landowners have been doing work along the shoreline without permits. These instances represent missed opportunities to work with landowners as part of the permit process to lessen the effects from construction techniques as well as to improve the existing baseline conditions. It is suggested that a separate study be undertaken in the future to understand why the differences in compliance rates are occurring. Understanding the why, would help craft specific and culturally relevant responses in both the urban and rural environments that could help improve the rate of compliance seen in this study.

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Apr 30th, 10:30 AM Apr 30th, 12:00 PM

The WRIA 9 Marine Shoreline Monitoring and Compliance Pilot Project

Room 6E

Boat based surveys were undertaken of the 92 miles of marine shoreline of Watershed Resource Inventory Area 9 (WRIA 9) in 2012 and 2013. The intent of the surveys was to collect shoreline condition data in order to update and compare baseline monitoring data sets as well as evaluate if the changes in condition were permitted. The survey in 2012 found 85 distinct changes in shoreline condition throughout the WRIA had occurred between 2004 and 2012. Changes associated with shoreline armoring accounted for 60% of the changes noted, with most changes being repairs to existing shoreline armoring infrastructure. The survey in 2013 found 60 distinct changes in shoreline condition occurred between 2012 and 2013. Only 33% of the changes were associated with shoreline armoring. In 2012, only 18 (20%) of the changes observed were permitted prior to the work being done. The compliance rate within each jurisdiction varied from 0 to 100%, with an average rate across all jurisdictions of 34%. Based on 2013 data from 4 of the 6 jurisdictions, 19 (40%) of the changes observed were permitted prior to the work being done. The compliance rate within each jurisdiction varied from 0 to 73%, with an average rate across all jurisdictions of 40%. A coarse level evaluation of the ecological and physical effects of changes was completed for all of the changes noted. In 2012, 34 (40%) of the changes encountered did not seem to have any obvious physical or ecological effects. In 2013, 23 (38%) of the changes encountered did not seem to have any physical or ecological effect. When comparing baseline conditions to existing conditions, there has been relatively little change in the overall amount of shoreline armoring within WRIA 9. This is because most of the changes noted to shoreline armoring were repairs or rebuilds to existing structures versus new structures and because the increase in new shoreline armoring was offset by restoration projects that have occurred since 2004. When comparing baseline vegetation conditions to existing conditions there has been a steady loss of treed areas over time. The surveys found that roughly 3 acres in 2012 and 2.5 acres in 2013 were cleared of trees and shrubs. The majority of these instances were unpermitted and occurred on Vashon and Maury Islands. It is clear that many landowners have been doing work along the shoreline without permits. These instances represent missed opportunities to work with landowners as part of the permit process to lessen the effects from construction techniques as well as to improve the existing baseline conditions. It is suggested that a separate study be undertaken in the future to understand why the differences in compliance rates are occurring. Understanding the why, would help craft specific and culturally relevant responses in both the urban and rural environments that could help improve the rate of compliance seen in this study.