Abstract Title

Session S-03F: Tools for Assessment and Implementation

Presenter/Author Information

Kathlene Barnhart, Kitsap County (Wash.)Follow

Keywords

Planning Assessment & Communication

Location

Room 602-603

Start Date

30-4-2014 3:30 PM

End Date

30-4-2014 5:00 PM

Description

Kitsap County’s Department of Community Development is actively participating in the development and use of several science-based nearshore assessments and tools. The integration of local knowledge and regional expertise has led to models that provide the tools needed to make systematic and informed restoration and protection decisions. One example is the County’s Nearshore Assessment (Battelle, 2009). County staff was involved in selecting functional indicators to ecosystem health and in collecting the field inventory. The result of this collaboration was a useable document in which County and other management programs use with a high level of confidence and understanding for shoreline planning and permitting. It has been used for: the identification and ranking of salmon recovery projects in two Lead Entities; locating nearshore culvert, piling, and debris removal projects; the technical basis for the Shoreline Master Program update; and helping to identify roster sites for the Hood Canal In-Lieu Fee Mitigation Program. Another example is the Sediment Source Analysis (Gerstel, 2012). This model provided a County-wide sediment-source rating by drift cell and nearshore reach. The County integrated it with biological and habitat indicators, a structure risk assessment, and results of a targeted landowner restoration interest survey. Together, these helped identify the best locations for bulkhead removal with both public and private willing landowners. As a result, multiple restoration projects are underway. These science-based assessments and tools are helping Kitsap County and other shoreline restoration practitioners to strategically prioritize and invest limited resources. In addition, these tools increase regulatory effectiveness by identifying areas for protection, and providing permit staff and applicants with more accurate information on which to make decisions, including where to locate the most effective mitigation.

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Apr 30th, 3:30 PM Apr 30th, 5:00 PM

Using Science-Based Landscape Level Nearshore Assessments to Implement Long-Term Restoration Goals

Room 602-603

Kitsap County’s Department of Community Development is actively participating in the development and use of several science-based nearshore assessments and tools. The integration of local knowledge and regional expertise has led to models that provide the tools needed to make systematic and informed restoration and protection decisions. One example is the County’s Nearshore Assessment (Battelle, 2009). County staff was involved in selecting functional indicators to ecosystem health and in collecting the field inventory. The result of this collaboration was a useable document in which County and other management programs use with a high level of confidence and understanding for shoreline planning and permitting. It has been used for: the identification and ranking of salmon recovery projects in two Lead Entities; locating nearshore culvert, piling, and debris removal projects; the technical basis for the Shoreline Master Program update; and helping to identify roster sites for the Hood Canal In-Lieu Fee Mitigation Program. Another example is the Sediment Source Analysis (Gerstel, 2012). This model provided a County-wide sediment-source rating by drift cell and nearshore reach. The County integrated it with biological and habitat indicators, a structure risk assessment, and results of a targeted landowner restoration interest survey. Together, these helped identify the best locations for bulkhead removal with both public and private willing landowners. As a result, multiple restoration projects are underway. These science-based assessments and tools are helping Kitsap County and other shoreline restoration practitioners to strategically prioritize and invest limited resources. In addition, these tools increase regulatory effectiveness by identifying areas for protection, and providing permit staff and applicants with more accurate information on which to make decisions, including where to locate the most effective mitigation.