Abstract Title

Session S-03E: Kelp Restoration

Keywords

Habitat

Start Date

30-4-2014 3:30 PM

End Date

30-4-2014 5:00 PM

Description

Bull kelp, Nereocystis luetkeana, has declined sharply in recent decades in central Strait of Georgia (Salish Sea) due to factors that are not well understood. The Nile Creek Enhancement Society started a project in 2011 to study local ocean conditions at a natural kelp bed (south Denman I.) and at a restoration site (Maude Reef, Hornby I.) where culture techniques are being applied to re-establish bull kelp. The project was funded by Pacific Salmon Foundation initially, with volunteer involvement from Hornby Island Diving, support from Conservancy Hornby Island, and collaboration with Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre, Vancouver Island University Deep Bay Station and the Save the Kelp project of Gabriola Island. A kelp culture grid was installed at Maude Reef and two years of work on kelp growout and monitoring of the restoration site in comparison with the natural kelp bed has been completed. Diver observations and results of temperature and light intensity measurements at two depths at each site will be presented and discussed.

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Apr 30th, 3:30 PM Apr 30th, 5:00 PM

Bull Kelp Restoration Project at Hornby Island, BC, Canada

Room 613-614

Bull kelp, Nereocystis luetkeana, has declined sharply in recent decades in central Strait of Georgia (Salish Sea) due to factors that are not well understood. The Nile Creek Enhancement Society started a project in 2011 to study local ocean conditions at a natural kelp bed (south Denman I.) and at a restoration site (Maude Reef, Hornby I.) where culture techniques are being applied to re-establish bull kelp. The project was funded by Pacific Salmon Foundation initially, with volunteer involvement from Hornby Island Diving, support from Conservancy Hornby Island, and collaboration with Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre, Vancouver Island University Deep Bay Station and the Save the Kelp project of Gabriola Island. A kelp culture grid was installed at Maude Reef and two years of work on kelp growout and monitoring of the restoration site in comparison with the natural kelp bed has been completed. Diver observations and results of temperature and light intensity measurements at two depths at each site will be presented and discussed.