Abstract Title

Session S-01F: Salish Sea Governance and Citizen Participation

Presenter/Author Information

Sam Barr, Samish Indian NationFollow

Keywords

Planning Assessment & Communication

Start Date

30-4-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

30-4-2014 12:00 PM

Description

Since “time immemorial”, Samish people have been stewards of the places they live. Traditional Lifeways require close observation of the natural world to know when to schedule important events. Times to harvest, times to preserve and times to rest are all shared by the environment. The Samish Indian Nation continues to care about our natural environment holistically and is concerned by changes in climate, ocean acidification, and loss of habitat that birds, animals, fish and humans depend on. Samish traditional knowledge is carried in song, stories and practices that deepen understanding of connection and human relationship with our natural surroundings. The Samish Indian Nation’s Department of Natural Resources is working to integrate this knowledge into current restoration and preservation projects that we are involved in. As well as incorporating the socio-cultural values of intergenerational involvement and the perspective of youth and elders. This presentation will include examples of how we are doing this, using our partnership involvement in the Cypress Island estuarine and salt marsh restoration project. Working with State, Federal and local agencies to identify, preserve, protect and enhance all natural resources within Samish historical and cultural territory is important to the Samish Communitiy, continuing a long tradition of natural resource stewardship.

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Apr 30th, 10:30 AM Apr 30th, 12:00 PM

A Partnership Between State and Tribal Department of Natural Resources

Room 602-603

Since “time immemorial”, Samish people have been stewards of the places they live. Traditional Lifeways require close observation of the natural world to know when to schedule important events. Times to harvest, times to preserve and times to rest are all shared by the environment. The Samish Indian Nation continues to care about our natural environment holistically and is concerned by changes in climate, ocean acidification, and loss of habitat that birds, animals, fish and humans depend on. Samish traditional knowledge is carried in song, stories and practices that deepen understanding of connection and human relationship with our natural surroundings. The Samish Indian Nation’s Department of Natural Resources is working to integrate this knowledge into current restoration and preservation projects that we are involved in. As well as incorporating the socio-cultural values of intergenerational involvement and the perspective of youth and elders. This presentation will include examples of how we are doing this, using our partnership involvement in the Cypress Island estuarine and salt marsh restoration project. Working with State, Federal and local agencies to identify, preserve, protect and enhance all natural resources within Samish historical and cultural territory is important to the Samish Communitiy, continuing a long tradition of natural resource stewardship.