Abstract Title

Session S-02H: Integrating the Social and Natural Sciences for Decision Making

Proposed Abstract Title

A social-ecological approach to estuary restoration planning: integrating social networks into landscapes

Keywords

Social Science Plus

Location

Room 607

Start Date

30-4-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

30-4-2014 3:00 PM

Description

Restoring the Salish Sea and its watersheds is vital for human wellbeing in the Pacific Northwest. However, restoring large regions is challenging from both social and ecological perspectives. Many government, non-profit, business, and citizen groups, acting at different scales (from local to national), need to coordinate their efforts to achieve restoration goals. Furthermore, the areas where groups work - formally or informally - often do not align with watershed boundaries, a phenomenon known as scale mismatch, which can undermine restoration efforts and natural resource governance more broadly. Thus, understanding how restoration groups are connected to one another and across the landscape is essential for restoration success. We provide this network perspective by integrating social and hydrologic networks and assess how social collaboration bridge hydrologic boundaries at multiple spatial levels. We then discuss how network actors perceive social borders and collaborations affect their restoration work. We use salmon recovery in the Whidbey Basin region, northeast Puget Sound, WA as a case study. We surveyed and interviewed people (n = 167 and a subset of 94, respectively) at local, county, state, federal, tribal government, non-profits, citizen groups, farming and shellfishing industries, and dike/drainage districts. We use the survey data to build a social network of organizations involved with restoration and relate this to the hydrologic network. This social-ecological integration allows us to visualize and identify where the structure of social collaborations may hinder, or promote restoration efforts. Our in-depth qualitative interviews ground our structural analysis revealing how collaborations and borders affect restoration. We present our framework as a social-ecological planning tool that can be integrated with ecological planning efforts such as WA Dept. of Ecology’s Watershed Characterization Project to better restoration efforts.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 30th, 1:30 PM Apr 30th, 3:00 PM

A social-ecological approach to estuary restoration planning: integrating social networks into landscapes

Room 607

Restoring the Salish Sea and its watersheds is vital for human wellbeing in the Pacific Northwest. However, restoring large regions is challenging from both social and ecological perspectives. Many government, non-profit, business, and citizen groups, acting at different scales (from local to national), need to coordinate their efforts to achieve restoration goals. Furthermore, the areas where groups work - formally or informally - often do not align with watershed boundaries, a phenomenon known as scale mismatch, which can undermine restoration efforts and natural resource governance more broadly. Thus, understanding how restoration groups are connected to one another and across the landscape is essential for restoration success. We provide this network perspective by integrating social and hydrologic networks and assess how social collaboration bridge hydrologic boundaries at multiple spatial levels. We then discuss how network actors perceive social borders and collaborations affect their restoration work. We use salmon recovery in the Whidbey Basin region, northeast Puget Sound, WA as a case study. We surveyed and interviewed people (n = 167 and a subset of 94, respectively) at local, county, state, federal, tribal government, non-profits, citizen groups, farming and shellfishing industries, and dike/drainage districts. We use the survey data to build a social network of organizations involved with restoration and relate this to the hydrologic network. This social-ecological integration allows us to visualize and identify where the structure of social collaborations may hinder, or promote restoration efforts. Our in-depth qualitative interviews ground our structural analysis revealing how collaborations and borders affect restoration. We present our framework as a social-ecological planning tool that can be integrated with ecological planning efforts such as WA Dept. of Ecology’s Watershed Characterization Project to better restoration efforts.