Abstract Title

Session S-01H: Social and Ecological Indicators

Keywords

Social Science Plus

Start Date

30-4-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

30-4-2014 12:00 PM

Description

This presentation describes a pilot study completed in 2013 that evaluated the sensitivity of Indigenous community health to climate change impacts on shorelines in the Salish Sea (Washington State, United States and British Columbia, Canada). Current climate change assessments do not reflect key community health concerns, yet meaningfully including these concerns is vital to successful adaptation plans, particularly for Indigenous communities. Descriptive scaling techniques were employed in facilitated workshops with two Indigenous communities to test the efficacy of ranking six key indicators of community health (Community Connection, Natural Resources Security, Cultural Use, Education, Self Determination and Well-being) in relation to projected changes in the biophysical environment (sea level rise, storm surge, beach armoring) and resultant impacts to shellfish habitat and shoreline archaeological sites. Findings demonstrate that: when shellfish habitat and archaeological resources are impacted, so too is Indigenous community health; not all community health indicators are equally impacted; and, the community health indicators of highest concern are not necessarily the same indicators most likely to be impacted. Based on the findings and feedback from community participants, the exploratory trials were successful, and such a tool may be useful to Indigenous communities who are assessing climate change sensitivities and creating adaptation plans.

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Apr 30th, 10:30 AM Apr 30th, 12:00 PM

Indigenous community health and climate change: Integrating social and natural science indicators

Room 607

This presentation describes a pilot study completed in 2013 that evaluated the sensitivity of Indigenous community health to climate change impacts on shorelines in the Salish Sea (Washington State, United States and British Columbia, Canada). Current climate change assessments do not reflect key community health concerns, yet meaningfully including these concerns is vital to successful adaptation plans, particularly for Indigenous communities. Descriptive scaling techniques were employed in facilitated workshops with two Indigenous communities to test the efficacy of ranking six key indicators of community health (Community Connection, Natural Resources Security, Cultural Use, Education, Self Determination and Well-being) in relation to projected changes in the biophysical environment (sea level rise, storm surge, beach armoring) and resultant impacts to shellfish habitat and shoreline archaeological sites. Findings demonstrate that: when shellfish habitat and archaeological resources are impacted, so too is Indigenous community health; not all community health indicators are equally impacted; and, the community health indicators of highest concern are not necessarily the same indicators most likely to be impacted. Based on the findings and feedback from community participants, the exploratory trials were successful, and such a tool may be useful to Indigenous communities who are assessing climate change sensitivities and creating adaptation plans.