Abstract Title

Session S-02G: Reimagining Shorelines

Presenter/Author Information

Christine Woodward, Samish Indian NationFollow

Keywords

Shorelines

Start Date

30-4-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

30-4-2014 3:00 PM

Description

In 2009, the Samish Indian Nation located in Anacortes Washington networked with a variety of local, state and federal agencies to restore 550 feet of eroding shoreline along Weaverling Spit with an engineered soft shore stabilization project to protect an archeological site that was in danger of eroding onto the beach. This project also provided habitat for forage fish spawning along with shade vegetation; and helped stabilize the shoreline along the popular Tommy Thompson pedestrian trail that was currently being impacted by erosion and in danger of being lost in certain portions. . Phase Two, The Central Weaverling Spit project that was completed in the fall 2011 and is located on tribal property, replenished the lost sediment by rebuilding a natural sloping beach from the edge of the past projects and stretching an additional 500 feet east. In addition the design also included the following: § Removing non-native debris from the beach, § Installing drift sills made of large root wads or large logs that stick out perpendicular from the bank. The sills which will be mostly buried under the gravel wedge, will serve to interrupt along-shore transport of the new gravel, so that the gravel will stay in place for as long as possible; § Planting native shrubs and trees. (this was completed 2 years in advance of the project) These projects are being used as an educational opportunity on bank stabilization and beach nourishment and focuses on the value of networking a wide variety of partners working together towards the same goal

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Apr 30th, 1:30 PM Apr 30th, 3:00 PM

Samish Indian Nation: Designing Successful Shoreline Projects

Room 6E

In 2009, the Samish Indian Nation located in Anacortes Washington networked with a variety of local, state and federal agencies to restore 550 feet of eroding shoreline along Weaverling Spit with an engineered soft shore stabilization project to protect an archeological site that was in danger of eroding onto the beach. This project also provided habitat for forage fish spawning along with shade vegetation; and helped stabilize the shoreline along the popular Tommy Thompson pedestrian trail that was currently being impacted by erosion and in danger of being lost in certain portions. . Phase Two, The Central Weaverling Spit project that was completed in the fall 2011 and is located on tribal property, replenished the lost sediment by rebuilding a natural sloping beach from the edge of the past projects and stretching an additional 500 feet east. In addition the design also included the following: § Removing non-native debris from the beach, § Installing drift sills made of large root wads or large logs that stick out perpendicular from the bank. The sills which will be mostly buried under the gravel wedge, will serve to interrupt along-shore transport of the new gravel, so that the gravel will stay in place for as long as possible; § Planting native shrubs and trees. (this was completed 2 years in advance of the project) These projects are being used as an educational opportunity on bank stabilization and beach nourishment and focuses on the value of networking a wide variety of partners working together towards the same goal