Abstract Title

Session S-01G: New Strategies for Shorelines

Presenter/Author Information

John SmallFollow

Keywords

Shorelines

Start Date

1-5-2014 5:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 6:30 PM

Description

Public agencies considering significant shoreline restoration projects in the Salish Sea region are often able to secure grant funding for capital costs, but they subsequently find that funding for operations and maintenance is more difficult to obtain. This creates concerns for agencies that are considering larger-scale restoration projects, which often carry significant long-term costs related to site operation and maintenance. This study compared the costs associated with the continued operation and maintenance of a 180-acre (73-hectare) shoreline park on Puget Sound with those of the same park after a $6 million (USD) restoration. The costs were generated using actual invoices for maintaining areas of the park where the restoration was implemented, as well as for a smaller, adjacent shoreline restoration completed in 2007; costs were projected over a 50-year time frame. The analysis also considered the ecosystem services provided by restoration to quantify the value of green infrastructure benefits of the restoration actions to the public. Maintenance and operation costs for the restored site included substantial early investment in establishing native vegetation in the backshore and riparian areas, where existing seawalls had been removed. These restoration costs also included the cost of beach nourishment that will periodically be required to supplement lost sediment supply that had historically supported beaches at the park, but which is now cut off by residential development. The study found that the overall cost of park operation and maintenance over the 50-year term was significantly lower after restoration, despite high initial costs for establishing native vegetation, occasional costs associated with beach nourishment and landslide management, and other events associated with restored natural processes.

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May 1st, 5:00 PM May 1st, 6:30 PM

Comparison of site maintenance and operations costs before and after a major shoreline restoration project

Room 6C

Public agencies considering significant shoreline restoration projects in the Salish Sea region are often able to secure grant funding for capital costs, but they subsequently find that funding for operations and maintenance is more difficult to obtain. This creates concerns for agencies that are considering larger-scale restoration projects, which often carry significant long-term costs related to site operation and maintenance. This study compared the costs associated with the continued operation and maintenance of a 180-acre (73-hectare) shoreline park on Puget Sound with those of the same park after a $6 million (USD) restoration. The costs were generated using actual invoices for maintaining areas of the park where the restoration was implemented, as well as for a smaller, adjacent shoreline restoration completed in 2007; costs were projected over a 50-year time frame. The analysis also considered the ecosystem services provided by restoration to quantify the value of green infrastructure benefits of the restoration actions to the public. Maintenance and operation costs for the restored site included substantial early investment in establishing native vegetation in the backshore and riparian areas, where existing seawalls had been removed. These restoration costs also included the cost of beach nourishment that will periodically be required to supplement lost sediment supply that had historically supported beaches at the park, but which is now cut off by residential development. The study found that the overall cost of park operation and maintenance over the 50-year term was significantly lower after restoration, despite high initial costs for establishing native vegetation, occasional costs associated with beach nourishment and landslide management, and other events associated with restored natural processes.