Abstract Title

Session S-05C: Using Stream Bugs to Manage and Restore Watersheds

Keywords

Freshwater

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 12:00 PM

Description

The focus of this presentation is to summarize the Department of Ecology’s collection, model development, and regulatory use of macroinvertebrate community data. Surface water quality standards for the State of Washington are developed and enforced by the Department of Ecology. These rules to protect state waters are expressed as numeric and narrative criteria in Washington Administrative Code 173-201A. Monitoring data and information are compared to these criteria to determine compliance with the standards. Water column monitoring data for numeric pollutant criteria do not always provide sufficient information alone to detect water quality problems that may be related to a combination of factors, such as flows from human actions, or streams that have been physically altered. Biological evaluations can improve efforts to determine where, and the extent to which, waters are impaired due to human actions. Ecology staff and others collect biological information from rivers and streams throughout the state. Ecology’s long-term monitoring program was established in 1993 to explore spatial patterns and identify temporal trends in benthic macroinvertebrate communities. Since that time the collection and use of this information has grown to include status and trend analysis, the identification of impaired waters under section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act, and compliance with wastewater discharge permits. This presentation first summarizes Ecology’s development of macroinvertebrate monitoring programs, statistical models, and protocols for sampling and stressor identification. We then discuss the challenges of applying these data in a regulatory context to implement the CWA programs for which Ecology is responsible, including the 303(d) list, Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDL) and wastewater discharge permits.

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May 1st, 10:30 AM May 1st, 12:00 PM

Washington State Department of Ecology: Biological Assessment Model Development and Use in State Regulatory Programs

Room 606

The focus of this presentation is to summarize the Department of Ecology’s collection, model development, and regulatory use of macroinvertebrate community data. Surface water quality standards for the State of Washington are developed and enforced by the Department of Ecology. These rules to protect state waters are expressed as numeric and narrative criteria in Washington Administrative Code 173-201A. Monitoring data and information are compared to these criteria to determine compliance with the standards. Water column monitoring data for numeric pollutant criteria do not always provide sufficient information alone to detect water quality problems that may be related to a combination of factors, such as flows from human actions, or streams that have been physically altered. Biological evaluations can improve efforts to determine where, and the extent to which, waters are impaired due to human actions. Ecology staff and others collect biological information from rivers and streams throughout the state. Ecology’s long-term monitoring program was established in 1993 to explore spatial patterns and identify temporal trends in benthic macroinvertebrate communities. Since that time the collection and use of this information has grown to include status and trend analysis, the identification of impaired waters under section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act, and compliance with wastewater discharge permits. This presentation first summarizes Ecology’s development of macroinvertebrate monitoring programs, statistical models, and protocols for sampling and stressor identification. We then discuss the challenges of applying these data in a regulatory context to implement the CWA programs for which Ecology is responsible, including the 303(d) list, Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDL) and wastewater discharge permits.