Abstract Title

Session S-05I: Education, Communication, and Citizen Science

Keywords

Citizens/Education

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 12:00 PM

Description

Engaging developers, real estate brokers and appraisers in understanding stormwater issues and solutions is key to realization of a paradigm shift in development and redevelopment approaches. WSU Extension has recently conducted and evaluated a series of clock-hour based courses around Washington’s portion of the Salish Sea focusing on stormwater issues, land use impacts, and solutions tailored to these professionals. These audiences were targeted for a number of reasons including: Real estate brokers can be or often work with small- and large-scale developers and can influence how development occurs; the sale/transfer of land is often at the nexus of re-development; educated real estate brokers can inform their clientele on options for preventing stormwater pollution and improving stormwater management; and appraisers need to incorporate proper valuation of LID for systemic change. Real estate brokers and appraisers in Washington need 30 hours of continuing education every 2 years for license renewal. Planners and developers also participate due to interest and to understand potential regulatory requirements. The program’s 7.5-hour workshops cover the need for improved stormwater management, site development and building strategies to minimize water runoff, options for retrofits, regulatory requirements, barriers and benefits to utilizing different techniques, and field trips showcasing some of the techniques in practice. To support the courses, a resource binder of relevant materials was provided, including a series of 6 factsheets on Low Impact Development topics that were developed for this audience. Two web-accessible videos on permeable pavement strategies and maintenance were also produced. This presentation will share the short- and mid-term impacts to increase awareness, understanding and acceptance by these audiences for utilizing LID to improve water management at the site scale.

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May 1st, 10:30 AM May 1st, 12:00 PM

Engaging Real Estate Professionals in Stormwater Solutions

Room 604

Engaging developers, real estate brokers and appraisers in understanding stormwater issues and solutions is key to realization of a paradigm shift in development and redevelopment approaches. WSU Extension has recently conducted and evaluated a series of clock-hour based courses around Washington’s portion of the Salish Sea focusing on stormwater issues, land use impacts, and solutions tailored to these professionals. These audiences were targeted for a number of reasons including: Real estate brokers can be or often work with small- and large-scale developers and can influence how development occurs; the sale/transfer of land is often at the nexus of re-development; educated real estate brokers can inform their clientele on options for preventing stormwater pollution and improving stormwater management; and appraisers need to incorporate proper valuation of LID for systemic change. Real estate brokers and appraisers in Washington need 30 hours of continuing education every 2 years for license renewal. Planners and developers also participate due to interest and to understand potential regulatory requirements. The program’s 7.5-hour workshops cover the need for improved stormwater management, site development and building strategies to minimize water runoff, options for retrofits, regulatory requirements, barriers and benefits to utilizing different techniques, and field trips showcasing some of the techniques in practice. To support the courses, a resource binder of relevant materials was provided, including a series of 6 factsheets on Low Impact Development topics that were developed for this audience. Two web-accessible videos on permeable pavement strategies and maintenance were also produced. This presentation will share the short- and mid-term impacts to increase awareness, understanding and acceptance by these audiences for utilizing LID to improve water management at the site scale.