Abstract Title

Session S-05I: Education, Communication, and Citizen Science

Keywords

Citizens/Education

Start Date

1-5-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

1-5-2014 12:00 PM

Description

Macroinvertebrate data collected by citizens and other non-professional volunteers have the potential to generate large amounts of data for environmental management while at the same time engaging the public in local stream monitoring projects and restoration efforts . However, there is concern about the quality and use of data collected by volunteers who have little or no scientific training. This presentation describes a macroinvertebrate sampling procedure designed for Citizen Science and examines nine years of biannual data collected by volunteers using the method to monitor two streams in western Oregon. Over the study period, family-level macroinvertebrate data collected by volunteers was highly variable (avg CV 0.3-0.6) but strongly correlated with climate-related factors (R2 = 0.22-0.49). The results of this investigation suggest that monitoring data collected by Citizen Scientists would likely detect major changes in macroinvertebrate populations and also provide long-term data sets needed to monitor the effects of climate change on stream biotic communities. From a stream management perspective, the findings of this study support the use of citizen science programs to augment or expand current efforts to monitor stream invertebrate communities.

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May 1st, 10:30 AM May 1st, 12:00 PM

Use of Biomonitoring Data Collected by Citizen Scientists for Stream Management.

Room 604

Macroinvertebrate data collected by citizens and other non-professional volunteers have the potential to generate large amounts of data for environmental management while at the same time engaging the public in local stream monitoring projects and restoration efforts . However, there is concern about the quality and use of data collected by volunteers who have little or no scientific training. This presentation describes a macroinvertebrate sampling procedure designed for Citizen Science and examines nine years of biannual data collected by volunteers using the method to monitor two streams in western Oregon. Over the study period, family-level macroinvertebrate data collected by volunteers was highly variable (avg CV 0.3-0.6) but strongly correlated with climate-related factors (R2 = 0.22-0.49). The results of this investigation suggest that monitoring data collected by Citizen Scientists would likely detect major changes in macroinvertebrate populations and also provide long-term data sets needed to monitor the effects of climate change on stream biotic communities. From a stream management perspective, the findings of this study support the use of citizen science programs to augment or expand current efforts to monitor stream invertebrate communities.