Abstract Title

Session S-06A: Novel Actions to Address Ocean Acidification in the Salish Sea

Presenter/Author Information

Alexis Valauri-Orton, N/AFollow

Keywords

Ocean Acidification

Location

Room 615-616-617

Start Date

1-5-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 3:00 PM

Description

Between July 2012-2013, I traveled on a Thomas J. Watson Fellowship studying how human communities in Norway, Hong Kong, Thailand, New Zealand, the Cook Islands and Peru might be affected by ocean acidification. I interviewed, lived and worked with hundreds of members of marine dependent communities, investigating how they valued resources threatened by ocean acidification. The vast majority of the community members I worked with had no knowledge of ocean acidification and poor ocean literacy. Thus, I developed tools to communicate and contextualize this complex science issue across language and cultural barriers. I found the best method of communication was to explain the science of ocean acidification in a personalized, narrative format, drawing from the lives of my audience to make connections between ocean acidification and resources and practices they value. In order to do this, I needed to listen carefully to the needs and concerns of each community. In this talk, I will share examples of how I did this in a variety of communities, ranging from Seventh Day Adventists in the Cook Islands to scallop farmers in Peru.

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May 1st, 1:30 PM May 1st, 3:00 PM

Communicating ocean acidification across barriers: Stories and strategies from a year around the world

Room 615-616-617

Between July 2012-2013, I traveled on a Thomas J. Watson Fellowship studying how human communities in Norway, Hong Kong, Thailand, New Zealand, the Cook Islands and Peru might be affected by ocean acidification. I interviewed, lived and worked with hundreds of members of marine dependent communities, investigating how they valued resources threatened by ocean acidification. The vast majority of the community members I worked with had no knowledge of ocean acidification and poor ocean literacy. Thus, I developed tools to communicate and contextualize this complex science issue across language and cultural barriers. I found the best method of communication was to explain the science of ocean acidification in a personalized, narrative format, drawing from the lives of my audience to make connections between ocean acidification and resources and practices they value. In order to do this, I needed to listen carefully to the needs and concerns of each community. In this talk, I will share examples of how I did this in a variety of communities, ranging from Seventh Day Adventists in the Cook Islands to scallop farmers in Peru.