Abstract Title

Session S-02G: Reimagining Shorelines

Proposed Abstract Title

Shore Armor Removal Portfolio

Presenter/Author Information

Alexis Blue, Coastal Geologic ServicesFollow

Keywords

Shorelines

Location

Room 6C

Start Date

1-5-2014 5:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 6:30 PM

Description

Shore armor, such as bulkheads, rock revetments, and seawalls, can negatively impact and impair the ecological functioning of coastal systems. When functioning as nature intended, Salish Sea shores provide vital foraging, cover, and quiet waters for juvenile salmonids during the smoltification process. The proliferation of shore armor from the development of Salish Sea has resulted in the reduction of ecological and physical complexity of shores utilized by salmonids and other valuable nearshore species. In many cases shore armor has been found to be unnecessary and alternatives to hard structures do exist; under these circumstances shore armor can be removed and the beaches and bluffs of the coastal system returned to their natural, functioning state. The legacy of shore armor associated with development can be surrounded by complex and sensitive issues, especially in regard to the residential property owners. However, the cumulative negative impacts of shore armor at the parcel level cannot be overlooked. Negative impacts of shore armor include reduced sediment input from bluffs that sustain beaches and spits down-drift, direct burial of the backshore and portions of the beach itself, and reduction in overhanging marine riparian vegetation resulting in an overall reduced beach width and loss of habitat area. Shore armor removal, where feasible, presents an opportunity to improve and rehabilitate habitat conditions for salmonid and other nearshore. This poster details shore armor removal projects at varying stages of development in Salish Sea. Moving forward, we believe that a showcase of successfully implemented shore armor removal projects, partnerships between agencies and organizations, as well as an informed and engaged public will help perpetuate progress toward recovering coastal systems and nearshore ecosystems in the Salish Sea. Thirty (30) Salish Sea bulkhead removal projects completed in the past 5 years will be presented on the poster including a brief description, client, project stage (feasibility, assessment, design, implementation, and monitoring), and photos. Before and after project implementation will be provided if available. The poster will also present each project location geographically on a map.

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May 1st, 5:00 PM May 1st, 6:30 PM

Shore Armor Removal Portfolio

Room 6C

Shore armor, such as bulkheads, rock revetments, and seawalls, can negatively impact and impair the ecological functioning of coastal systems. When functioning as nature intended, Salish Sea shores provide vital foraging, cover, and quiet waters for juvenile salmonids during the smoltification process. The proliferation of shore armor from the development of Salish Sea has resulted in the reduction of ecological and physical complexity of shores utilized by salmonids and other valuable nearshore species. In many cases shore armor has been found to be unnecessary and alternatives to hard structures do exist; under these circumstances shore armor can be removed and the beaches and bluffs of the coastal system returned to their natural, functioning state. The legacy of shore armor associated with development can be surrounded by complex and sensitive issues, especially in regard to the residential property owners. However, the cumulative negative impacts of shore armor at the parcel level cannot be overlooked. Negative impacts of shore armor include reduced sediment input from bluffs that sustain beaches and spits down-drift, direct burial of the backshore and portions of the beach itself, and reduction in overhanging marine riparian vegetation resulting in an overall reduced beach width and loss of habitat area. Shore armor removal, where feasible, presents an opportunity to improve and rehabilitate habitat conditions for salmonid and other nearshore. This poster details shore armor removal projects at varying stages of development in Salish Sea. Moving forward, we believe that a showcase of successfully implemented shore armor removal projects, partnerships between agencies and organizations, as well as an informed and engaged public will help perpetuate progress toward recovering coastal systems and nearshore ecosystems in the Salish Sea. Thirty (30) Salish Sea bulkhead removal projects completed in the past 5 years will be presented on the poster including a brief description, client, project stage (feasibility, assessment, design, implementation, and monitoring), and photos. Before and after project implementation will be provided if available. The poster will also present each project location geographically on a map.