Abstract Title

Session S-06D: Marine Survival of Salmon and Steelhead: the Salish Sea Marine Survival Project

Keywords

Species and Food Webs

Start Date

1-5-2014 1:30 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 3:00 PM

Description

Early Marine Survival (EMS) of Chinook and Coho salmon in the Salish Sea has plummeted over the past decades, and both bottom-up and top-down mechanisms for decline have been proposed. As a background for an ecosystem-based assessment of EMS, a pilot study on the basic oceanography of a small sub-component of the system was launched in spring and early summer, 2013. A repeat sampling grid covering Cowichan Bay and immediately connected waters was established, and then sampled on weekly intervals for temperature, salinity, chlorophyll fluorescence, nutrients and zooplankton. Oceanographic studies were carried out concurrently with fisheries assessments. A longer section was carried out at monthly intervals, with the purpose of connecting Cowichan Bay to the Strait of Georgia. This talk will present findings from this study, identify key shortcoming and suggest an approach to expand the pilot study to the scale of the Salish Sea.

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May 1st, 1:30 PM May 1st, 3:00 PM

Oceanography of Cowichan Bay: A background view for early marine survival of Chinook and Coho salmon

Room 611-612

Early Marine Survival (EMS) of Chinook and Coho salmon in the Salish Sea has plummeted over the past decades, and both bottom-up and top-down mechanisms for decline have been proposed. As a background for an ecosystem-based assessment of EMS, a pilot study on the basic oceanography of a small sub-component of the system was launched in spring and early summer, 2013. A repeat sampling grid covering Cowichan Bay and immediately connected waters was established, and then sampled on weekly intervals for temperature, salinity, chlorophyll fluorescence, nutrients and zooplankton. Oceanographic studies were carried out concurrently with fisheries assessments. A longer section was carried out at monthly intervals, with the purpose of connecting Cowichan Bay to the Strait of Georgia. This talk will present findings from this study, identify key shortcoming and suggest an approach to expand the pilot study to the scale of the Salish Sea.