Abstract Title

Session S-07C: Water Pollution Identification and Correction (PIC) Programs: Methods, Resources, and Success Stories

Keywords

Water Quality

Start Date

1-5-2014 3:30 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 5:00 PM

Description

Bacterial and nutrient contamination of streams and marine water effect many areas around the Salish Sea. Identifying and correcting the sources of this pollution can be a challenging task. This project investigated using a suite of chemicals known as Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CEC) to differentiate between human-associated sources such as sewage or farm runoff, and those coming from natural sources like wildlife. These CEC are chemicals which include medicines, herbicides, and compounds commonly consumed by humans. Advances in analytical methods over the last decade allow these compounds to be detected at very low concentrations (ng/L) in surface water samples. Surface water impacted by human activity may contain CEC that could be used to identify likely sources. To test this hypothesis, sampling was conducted under a collaborative partnership between the Kitsap Public Health District, and University of Washington Center for Urban Waters. Sites were selected to represent locations affected by known failing septic systems, agricultural run off, some unknown sources, and background controls. Samples were analyzed for a suite of 20 CEC compounds, as well as fecal coliform bacteria, nitrogen, and phosphorous. The results indicate that CEC in the environment can be highly variable, depending on the type of source, transport pathway, and site conditions. Some compounds are persistent and widespread, while others are rarely detected. Individual CEC compounds used by themselves are probably not suitable to differentiate pollution from human activites. However, several compounds used together, such as ibuprofen, acetominophen, and metabolites of caffeine and nicotine show promising correlation with human sources of bacterial pollution. The value of other CEC as source tracking tools may depend on using them in combination, or in comparison to background concentrations. NOTE: Another abstract based on this sampling project has been submitted for the session on Occurrence and Impacts of Contaminants of Emerging Concern. (Paper#236) This abstract is for an oral presentation in the Water Pollution Identification & Correction session.

Comments

Author Shawn Ultican provided an updated version of this presentation on July 21, 2017. The updated version has replaced the original presentation.

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May 1st, 3:30 PM May 1st, 5:00 PM

Contaminants of Emerging Concern as a Tool to Differentiate Bacterial Contamination from Human Activity

Room 606

Bacterial and nutrient contamination of streams and marine water effect many areas around the Salish Sea. Identifying and correcting the sources of this pollution can be a challenging task. This project investigated using a suite of chemicals known as Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CEC) to differentiate between human-associated sources such as sewage or farm runoff, and those coming from natural sources like wildlife. These CEC are chemicals which include medicines, herbicides, and compounds commonly consumed by humans. Advances in analytical methods over the last decade allow these compounds to be detected at very low concentrations (ng/L) in surface water samples. Surface water impacted by human activity may contain CEC that could be used to identify likely sources. To test this hypothesis, sampling was conducted under a collaborative partnership between the Kitsap Public Health District, and University of Washington Center for Urban Waters. Sites were selected to represent locations affected by known failing septic systems, agricultural run off, some unknown sources, and background controls. Samples were analyzed for a suite of 20 CEC compounds, as well as fecal coliform bacteria, nitrogen, and phosphorous. The results indicate that CEC in the environment can be highly variable, depending on the type of source, transport pathway, and site conditions. Some compounds are persistent and widespread, while others are rarely detected. Individual CEC compounds used by themselves are probably not suitable to differentiate pollution from human activites. However, several compounds used together, such as ibuprofen, acetominophen, and metabolites of caffeine and nicotine show promising correlation with human sources of bacterial pollution. The value of other CEC as source tracking tools may depend on using them in combination, or in comparison to background concentrations. NOTE: Another abstract based on this sampling project has been submitted for the session on Occurrence and Impacts of Contaminants of Emerging Concern. (Paper#236) This abstract is for an oral presentation in the Water Pollution Identification & Correction session.