Abstract Title

Session S-07E: Aquatic Vegetation

Proposed Abstract Title

Biofouling and marine invasions in Puget Sound: evaluating the problem and developing vector-based solutions

Presenter/Author Information

Kimberly HolzerFollow

Keywords

Habitat

Location

Room 6C

Start Date

1-5-2014 5:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 6:30 PM

Description

Bioinvasions are an aspect of anthropogenic change to marine and estuarine systems that can be reduced through prudent pre-introduction and post-introduction management strategies. Our project evaluated the extent of invertebrate and algae invasions to Puget Sound, the vectors responsible for their incursion, current vector activity in the region, and worldwide management policies that may guide future Washington programs to reduce biofouling risks. We estimate that 74 non-native invertebrates and algae are established in Puget Sound, with 59 established on Washington’s Pacific Coast, for a total of 94 distinct species throughout the State (excluding the Columbia River). Bivalves imported for aquaculture prior to 1900 are among the earliest known introductions in the State, and historically the aquaculture vector played a strong role in generating the region’s invasion patterns. However, since 1950 the growing invasion rate (64% of new introduced species) in the Puget Sound is associated with the biofouling vector. This may be of little surprise considering the region’s high volume of maritime traffic and persistence as a major maritime transportation hub. Annually Puget Sound receives ≈3,200 arrivals from > 1,000 unique commercial ships; there are ≈25,000 fishing vessel landings; and >20,000 foreign recreational boat arrivals. Solutions to reducing the invasion rate include policies that (1) promote operational characteristics of vessels (and other biofouling vectors) to maintain low biofouling accumulation and (2) intercept high-risk events before they occur.

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May 1st, 5:00 PM May 1st, 6:30 PM

Biofouling and marine invasions in Puget Sound: evaluating the problem and developing vector-based solutions

Room 6C

Bioinvasions are an aspect of anthropogenic change to marine and estuarine systems that can be reduced through prudent pre-introduction and post-introduction management strategies. Our project evaluated the extent of invertebrate and algae invasions to Puget Sound, the vectors responsible for their incursion, current vector activity in the region, and worldwide management policies that may guide future Washington programs to reduce biofouling risks. We estimate that 74 non-native invertebrates and algae are established in Puget Sound, with 59 established on Washington’s Pacific Coast, for a total of 94 distinct species throughout the State (excluding the Columbia River). Bivalves imported for aquaculture prior to 1900 are among the earliest known introductions in the State, and historically the aquaculture vector played a strong role in generating the region’s invasion patterns. However, since 1950 the growing invasion rate (64% of new introduced species) in the Puget Sound is associated with the biofouling vector. This may be of little surprise considering the region’s high volume of maritime traffic and persistence as a major maritime transportation hub. Annually Puget Sound receives ≈3,200 arrivals from > 1,000 unique commercial ships; there are ≈25,000 fishing vessel landings; and >20,000 foreign recreational boat arrivals. Solutions to reducing the invasion rate include policies that (1) promote operational characteristics of vessels (and other biofouling vectors) to maintain low biofouling accumulation and (2) intercept high-risk events before they occur.