Abstract Title

Session S-07E: Aquatic Vegetation

Presenter/Author Information

Nicole Burnett, Padilla Bay NERRFollow

Keywords

Habitat

Location

Room 613-614

Start Date

1-5-2014 3:30 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 5:00 PM

Description

Padilla Bay, Washington is a shallow intertidal bay with over 8000 acres of eelgrass. Therefore, it can serve as a good proxy for the response to climate change for estuaries in the Salish Sea that are rich with aquatic vegetation. However, limited studies have been done in Padilla Bay to look at basic temporal and spatial patterns of such things as zooplankton despite its importance to nutrient cycling, energy transfer, population recruitment, and indicator of ecosystem health and changing climate. To address the lack of continuous monitoring, we initiated a monthly zooplankton monitoring program at the Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) in 2007. Samples are collected at three sites in the bay. Two of these sites are located in channels draining eelgrass covered flats, and the third is in deep water outside the subtidal edge of the eelgrass beds. As part of the NERR system, long term monitoring of weather, water quality and nutrient concentrations have been conducted specific to each of these sites in Padilla Bay. With seven years of zooplankton, water, nutrient, and weather data, we can begin to look at zooplankton community changes in relation to physical and chemical changes both seasonally and interannually. This baseline data then serves as a place to evaluate changes in the zooplankton community due to natural oscillation, anthropogenic forces, and climate change.

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May 1st, 3:30 PM May 1st, 5:00 PM

Zooplankton Monitoring in the Eelgrass Dominated Padilla Bay: A baseline for Examining Future Changes.

Room 613-614

Padilla Bay, Washington is a shallow intertidal bay with over 8000 acres of eelgrass. Therefore, it can serve as a good proxy for the response to climate change for estuaries in the Salish Sea that are rich with aquatic vegetation. However, limited studies have been done in Padilla Bay to look at basic temporal and spatial patterns of such things as zooplankton despite its importance to nutrient cycling, energy transfer, population recruitment, and indicator of ecosystem health and changing climate. To address the lack of continuous monitoring, we initiated a monthly zooplankton monitoring program at the Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) in 2007. Samples are collected at three sites in the bay. Two of these sites are located in channels draining eelgrass covered flats, and the third is in deep water outside the subtidal edge of the eelgrass beds. As part of the NERR system, long term monitoring of weather, water quality and nutrient concentrations have been conducted specific to each of these sites in Padilla Bay. With seven years of zooplankton, water, nutrient, and weather data, we can begin to look at zooplankton community changes in relation to physical and chemical changes both seasonally and interannually. This baseline data then serves as a place to evaluate changes in the zooplankton community due to natural oscillation, anthropogenic forces, and climate change.