Abstract Title

Session S-07G: Integrating Landscape Scale Assessments Into Local Planning II

Keywords

Planning Assessment & Communication

Start Date

1-5-2014 3:30 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 5:00 PM

Description

The 2005 Snohomish Basin Salmon Conservation Plan identified targets for improvement in habitat conditions for all salmonid species but in particular ESA listed Chinook. While progress has been made in the basin on restoring habitat and updating land use regulations to reflect best available science, yet a comprehensive and strategic protection strategy, including acquisition, incentives, regulations, policy and education, has not been developed. Land use pressures and climate change threaten to overwhelm gains made through restoration and undermine the long-term viability of fish populations. The Snohomish Basin Protection Plan is an EPA-funded grant project developed through a partnership between Snohomish County, the Tulalip Tribes and King County that will serve as an addendum to the 2005 Conservation Plan. This protection effort identifies hydrology as the critical process to salmon survival and recovery and focuses on those areas essential to the hydrologic health of the basin, regardless of the level of degradation. The technical approach assesses the existing conditions of the landscape using patterns of land use and fish distribution as well as the WA Department of Ecology Watershed Characterization, ecosystem services information and local knowledge about protection opportunities from the Snohomish Basin Technical Committee. Areas important to the hydrologic functions of the basin were highlighted for protection and strategies that were identified to protect these areas included different tools ranging from landowner tax incentive programs to new policy recommendations that would offer greater protection to these critical areas. The effort developed a comprehensive and explicit protection strategy for the basin to address threats and emerging problems that also accommodates growth while protecting areas critical to the hydrologic health of the basin.

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May 1st, 3:30 PM May 1st, 5:00 PM

Snohomish Basin Protection Plan - innovative approaches to hydrology protection opportunities

Room 6E

The 2005 Snohomish Basin Salmon Conservation Plan identified targets for improvement in habitat conditions for all salmonid species but in particular ESA listed Chinook. While progress has been made in the basin on restoring habitat and updating land use regulations to reflect best available science, yet a comprehensive and strategic protection strategy, including acquisition, incentives, regulations, policy and education, has not been developed. Land use pressures and climate change threaten to overwhelm gains made through restoration and undermine the long-term viability of fish populations. The Snohomish Basin Protection Plan is an EPA-funded grant project developed through a partnership between Snohomish County, the Tulalip Tribes and King County that will serve as an addendum to the 2005 Conservation Plan. This protection effort identifies hydrology as the critical process to salmon survival and recovery and focuses on those areas essential to the hydrologic health of the basin, regardless of the level of degradation. The technical approach assesses the existing conditions of the landscape using patterns of land use and fish distribution as well as the WA Department of Ecology Watershed Characterization, ecosystem services information and local knowledge about protection opportunities from the Snohomish Basin Technical Committee. Areas important to the hydrologic functions of the basin were highlighted for protection and strategies that were identified to protect these areas included different tools ranging from landowner tax incentive programs to new policy recommendations that would offer greater protection to these critical areas. The effort developed a comprehensive and explicit protection strategy for the basin to address threats and emerging problems that also accommodates growth while protecting areas critical to the hydrologic health of the basin.