Abstract Title

Session S-07H: Assessing, Planning and Adapting to Climate Change Impacts in Skagit River Watershed

Keywords

Shorelines

Location

Room 607

Start Date

1-5-2014 3:30 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 5:00 PM

Description

The many thousands of miles of Northwest marine coastline are extremely diverse andcontain important human-built and natural assets upon which our communities and ecosystemsdepend. Due to the variety of coastal landform types (e.g., sandy beaches, rocky shorelines, bluffsof varying slopes and composition, river deltas, and estuaries), the region’s marine coastal areasstand to experience a wide range of climate impacts, in both type and severity. These impactsinclude increases in ocean temperature and acidity, erosion, and more severe and frequentinundation from the combined effects of rising sea levels and storms, among others.Increases in coastal inundation and erosion are key concerns. A recent assessmentdetermined that the coastal areas of Washington and Oregon contain over 56,656 hectares(140,000 acres) of land within 1.0-meter (3.3-feet) elevation of high tide (Strauss et al. 2012).Rising sea levels coupled with the possibility of intensifying coastal storms will increase thelikelihood of more severe coastal flooding and erosion in these areas.The Northwest is also facing the challenge of increasing ocean acidification, and isexperiencing these changes earlier, and more acutely, than most other regions around the globe(NOAA OAR 2012).The Third National Climate Assessment is scheduled for release in the spring of 2014.The authors will provide an overview of the key Northwest coastal findings in this report as wellas a summary of its primary companion report published by Island Press in December 2013,Climate Change in the Northwest: Implications for Our Landscapes, Waters, and Communities(Dalton et al 2013).

Share

COinS
 
May 1st, 3:30 PM May 1st, 5:00 PM

Coastal Impacts of Climate Change in the Northwest: A Summary of the Findings of the upcoming National Climate Assessment

Room 607

The many thousands of miles of Northwest marine coastline are extremely diverse andcontain important human-built and natural assets upon which our communities and ecosystemsdepend. Due to the variety of coastal landform types (e.g., sandy beaches, rocky shorelines, bluffsof varying slopes and composition, river deltas, and estuaries), the region’s marine coastal areasstand to experience a wide range of climate impacts, in both type and severity. These impactsinclude increases in ocean temperature and acidity, erosion, and more severe and frequentinundation from the combined effects of rising sea levels and storms, among others.Increases in coastal inundation and erosion are key concerns. A recent assessmentdetermined that the coastal areas of Washington and Oregon contain over 56,656 hectares(140,000 acres) of land within 1.0-meter (3.3-feet) elevation of high tide (Strauss et al. 2012).Rising sea levels coupled with the possibility of intensifying coastal storms will increase thelikelihood of more severe coastal flooding and erosion in these areas.The Northwest is also facing the challenge of increasing ocean acidification, and isexperiencing these changes earlier, and more acutely, than most other regions around the globe(NOAA OAR 2012).The Third National Climate Assessment is scheduled for release in the spring of 2014.The authors will provide an overview of the key Northwest coastal findings in this report as wellas a summary of its primary companion report published by Island Press in December 2013,Climate Change in the Northwest: Implications for Our Landscapes, Waters, and Communities(Dalton et al 2013).