Abstract Title

Session S-08G: Rethinking Our Waterways: Effective Collaboration with Landowners, Project Partners and Decision Makers

Presenter/Author Information

Christine SteeleFollow

Keywords

Shorelines

Start Date

1-5-2014 5:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 6:30 PM

Description

The aerial perspective is a useful tool to understand watershed-scale issues and to bring stakeholders and decision-makers together for collaborative restoration and management initiatives. Watershed-scale dynamics and processes are complex. Layer on multiple political jurisdictions, competing land uses, topography, and ecology and the issues can seem abstract and disjointed. In addition, the ability to gather objective data and monitor progress can be a vital part of protection and restoration efforts. Through the aerial perspective provided by a small plane: interconnections between differing land use types are easier to understand; monitoring vast and remote areas is completed more effectively and requires less time; threats and opportunities can be identified, documented and presented to the public more effectively. In addition, elected officials, state and federal agencies; local conservation districts; shellfish growers; dairy farmers; tribal leaders and others can collaborate more effectively when they can better understand the multiple perspectives represented in a watershed. The aerial perspective allows people to truly understand a river system from the headwaters to the delta. This presentation will focus on two case studies in the Puget Sound region (the Samish River and the Nisqually River) where the use of the aerial perspective has been instrumental in fostering successful outcomes.

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May 1st, 5:00 PM May 1st, 6:30 PM

The aerial perspective as a tool for collaborative restoration and management initiatives.

Room 6C

The aerial perspective is a useful tool to understand watershed-scale issues and to bring stakeholders and decision-makers together for collaborative restoration and management initiatives. Watershed-scale dynamics and processes are complex. Layer on multiple political jurisdictions, competing land uses, topography, and ecology and the issues can seem abstract and disjointed. In addition, the ability to gather objective data and monitor progress can be a vital part of protection and restoration efforts. Through the aerial perspective provided by a small plane: interconnections between differing land use types are easier to understand; monitoring vast and remote areas is completed more effectively and requires less time; threats and opportunities can be identified, documented and presented to the public more effectively. In addition, elected officials, state and federal agencies; local conservation districts; shellfish growers; dairy farmers; tribal leaders and others can collaborate more effectively when they can better understand the multiple perspectives represented in a watershed. The aerial perspective allows people to truly understand a river system from the headwaters to the delta. This presentation will focus on two case studies in the Puget Sound region (the Samish River and the Nisqually River) where the use of the aerial perspective has been instrumental in fostering successful outcomes.