Abstract Title

Session S-08H: Incentives, Guidance and Collaboration for Greener Shorelines

Proposed Abstract Title

Reducing Negative Impacts of Shore Armoring Through Targeted Landowner Outreach, Incentives, and Planner Education

Presenter/Author Information

Robyn Du PreFollow

Keywords

Social Science Plus

Location

Room 6C

Start Date

1-5-2014 5:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2014 6:30 PM

Description

This project sought to reduce harmful effects of shore hardening in the Port Susan Marine Stewardship Area (PSMSA), reaching two target audiences most likely to influence decisions regarding shore hardening: county planners who issue shoreline development permits and coastal property owners seeking to obtain these permits. The project focused on the PSMSA as a geographically distinct location, with a lower than average amount of shore armoring and a moderately high stewardship ethic amongst residents. Project Highlights: Planner needs assessment and education: A needs assessment was conducted prior to offering an educational workshop in order to characterize the target audience and identify training needs. The workshop focused on nearshore processes, instances when a structure would be indicated, and the characteristics of “soft-shore” approaches to armoring. Landowner Education and Incentives: Pre-workshop survey data were compiled to ascertain the concerns of coastal property owners. The greatest concern was erosion and loss of value due to erosion. Cost was identified as a barrier to property owners receiving professional advice about management options for their shorelines. Two workshops were offered focusing on shoreline processes and best management practices specific to the shore of the PSMSA. Property owners in priority shoreline areas were offered free site visits by a coastal geologist or a vegetation management specialist to receive shoreline management recommendations. Key Results: The biggest need identified by planners regarding landowners was education regarding permitting, regulations, coastal processes, and management alternatives. Landowners were often saddled with homes built too close to the shore, prescribing a narrow range of management alternatives. Professional site visits were found to be viewed as a valuable incentive by property owners encouraging them to learn about their management options.

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May 1st, 5:00 PM May 1st, 6:30 PM

Reducing Negative Impacts of Shore Armoring Through Targeted Landowner Outreach, Incentives, and Planner Education

Room 6C

This project sought to reduce harmful effects of shore hardening in the Port Susan Marine Stewardship Area (PSMSA), reaching two target audiences most likely to influence decisions regarding shore hardening: county planners who issue shoreline development permits and coastal property owners seeking to obtain these permits. The project focused on the PSMSA as a geographically distinct location, with a lower than average amount of shore armoring and a moderately high stewardship ethic amongst residents. Project Highlights: Planner needs assessment and education: A needs assessment was conducted prior to offering an educational workshop in order to characterize the target audience and identify training needs. The workshop focused on nearshore processes, instances when a structure would be indicated, and the characteristics of “soft-shore” approaches to armoring. Landowner Education and Incentives: Pre-workshop survey data were compiled to ascertain the concerns of coastal property owners. The greatest concern was erosion and loss of value due to erosion. Cost was identified as a barrier to property owners receiving professional advice about management options for their shorelines. Two workshops were offered focusing on shoreline processes and best management practices specific to the shore of the PSMSA. Property owners in priority shoreline areas were offered free site visits by a coastal geologist or a vegetation management specialist to receive shoreline management recommendations. Key Results: The biggest need identified by planners regarding landowners was education regarding permitting, regulations, coastal processes, and management alternatives. Landowners were often saddled with homes built too close to the shore, prescribing a narrow range of management alternatives. Professional site visits were found to be viewed as a valuable incentive by property owners encouraging them to learn about their management options.